Aaron’s Radio Show

Episode 21

My Three Songs with Sandy Mack-Behrens

 

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Notes

Episode Notes

EPISODE 21 – My Three Songs with Sandy Mack-Behrens:  Welcome, everyone, to Episode 21. This is the eleventh in our series of episodes called My Three Songs where my guest chooses three memorable songs and we listen to the songs and talk about why they are meaningful to my guest.

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Three Songs

  1. I Want You Back – The Jackson 5 (1969)
  2. Me and Bobby McGee – Janis Joplin (1971)
  3. Spinning Away – Brian Eno & John Cale (1990)

Aaron’s Radio Show has been licensed by ASCAP and BMI to include songs from their repertories in performances on this website.

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Transcript

This transcript was originally generated using artificial intelligence ("AI") software. It has been edited by a human being, but it may still contain some misspellings, lack necessary punctuation, or include other anomalies. We are regularly working to improve our transcripts!


Jake:

Coming to you almost live from Berkeley, California. It's Aaron's Radio Show, with your host, Aaron Gobler.

Aaron Gobler:

Thanks, Jake. And welcome, everybody to Episode 21. Welcome to My Three Songs where I play three special songs chosen by my guests, and we talk about why they chose each song. Today my guest is my Facebook friend, Sandie Mack Behrens. How are you today, Sandie?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I am doing okay, how are you?

Aaron Gobler:

I'm doing well. Doing well. Thank you. You're in Philadelphia. Is that right?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I am in Philadelphia. I live in the Mayfair section of Philadelphia in the Great Northeast. So I'm closer to Bucks County than I am to Center City. And I'm pretty near the Tacony-Palmyra bridge.

Aaron Gobler:

And did you grow up in that area in Philadelphia or in that area?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I did not. I was born in Boston. And I moved from Boston, four or five. And then we moved to Hightstown, New Jersey. And then from there, I moved to Minnesota where I stayed there for nine years. And then I came back to the east coast and finished up high school. Since then I've lived in the tri state area either New York, New Jersey, or Pennsylvania since. I've been a resident of Philadelphia for about 15 years now.

Aaron Gobler:

Oh, nice. Nice. Yeah, I, I grew up on the outskirts of Philadelphia, but I know the city very well. And I can still visit most of it in my mind. So that's good. And you mentioned Hightstown. And that stuck out for me because that is where you likely met our mutual friend Bari Siegel, who I went to college with. Is that right?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

That is correct, yes, Bari.

Aaron Gobler:

Now, I'd love to get Bari on as a guest. But that's another topic. Do you think she'd be a good guest?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I think she'd be a great guest.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes. Yeah, I'm sure. So what made you want to be on the show?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

So I'm always teased about my eclectic collection of music. And I thought maybe it's not so eclectic, number one. And number two, it would be nice to talk about the choices, the things that I like with someone and just actually have a discussion.

Aaron Gobler:

So you felt like this was a safe place to to share the most private thoughts you have about a variety of songs?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I think so. I mean, I believe you and I are our generational peers. Right. So you will not lambaste me for listening to something, you know, from my youth, or ...

Aaron Gobler:

I hear you.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

And I think it could be like a really great discussion. Because music is like the soundtrack of our lives. And you can usually pinpoint the first time you've heard a song or where a song has played like a pivotal role. And I thought that this is like really a great exercise, especially now since people are feeling a little upside down. I thought that it's a great time to kind of express, you know, how music makes you feel, and how important it is in our lives. And how important it is to me.

Aaron Gobler:

As you were as you were saying that I'm thinking there's a certain comfort you get you can you get when you're talking to contemporaries about cultural things like, you know, music or movies or, and that there is some fear of rejection or funny faces from someone who's younger or older. Probably more likely, someone who's younger, like, you know, like a child like your child or one of their friends or something that you're going to mention some kind of, you know, cultural reference that they have absolutely no idea about and they think that you're like totally, really, really old.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

It doesn't even have to be your child. You know, I work for a consultancy, and a lot of the people that I work with are 20, 25, 30 years younger than me So, you know, when we use those wonderful cultural references, like one of my favorites is from The Breakfast Club when Bender, I believe says, "The world is not a perfect place. Screws fall out all the time." I find that hilarious. They all look at me like I'm a crazy person.

Aaron Gobler:

But then someone else might be like, Oh my God, that's like, Yeah, completely. Yeah. And then I, what fascinates me with, I have two young adult daughters is, is they'll be singing some song or playing something. And I'm like, how did you hear that? You know, often the answer is "Glee". They got from "Glee", you know, many years ago, but they're like, well, that used to play that you play that on your computer, you know, my, my iTunes or whatever a lot when you were working over the years, and I heard it that way, or, or something. And it's just rewarding that they actually can enjoy a lot of the stuff that we grew up with. And I'm always surprised when when they really are connected to some song that that I have no idea how they originally heard or, or something, so.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I think that's a really great point, because my son had once sent me a text. And he said something like, do you remember this song? And I'm like, Yes, I do. And it was, he sent me this song from Pete Townshend. And I used to play, I used to play "Another Scoop" relentlessly. I had gotten into this was like, like oxygen for me for a while. Okay, and he said, I got it off iTunes. I don't know why I was thinking about it today. And it's just like one of these really obscure Townshend songs. Actually, it's his cover of "Save It For Later".

Aaron Gobler:

Okay.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I thought that's really bizarre, right? But it was really it was also very gratifying. And then, you know, Christopher, and I started like trading songs, like, do you remember this? It's like, yeah, he's, you know, he was a huge Led Zeppelin fan for like, three years, like, all he wanted to do was listen to Zeppelin songs and so we talked about that, we talked about and then, you know, he started rolling into, like, his own discovery of music. And I encouraged him to, he listens to everything, a lot of everything, too. And I think that's like, the best thing a parent can give a child is an appreciation of like, the different genres.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, I agree that the kids are going to be exposed to certain things on their own. But if you can take your kids to to an actual orchestra, orchestra performance, or my dad used to love John Philip Sousa, and so that got me into John Philip Sousa, or at least I can, I recognize a lot of the songs and and then I'm also thinking about, about how you know, how people are exposed to music, and I was with my dad in the car, and when he was playing and he was listening to the classical station, and Tchaikovsky is playing. And he said, Do you know what this, you know who this is or something? And I said, Yeah, this is a song from "Caddyshack". And then he would look at me indignantly and said, "This is Tchaikovsky!", you know, but it was that song they played in the pool scene it, you know, where they're doing the water ballet?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

Yes.

Aaron Gobler:

And it probably was something from the "Nutcracker". But in any case, you know, there was a time where I was listening to something on MTV, and he came in the room and he said, or he just heard the music and he said, "Is that David Bowie?" My Dad's like, was about 40 years older than me. I was like, "Yeah, it's David Bowie", and he was so excited. He probably felt like he had some kind of connection all of a sudden, like, wow, you know, I know a song.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

A quick story. I wanted "Diamond Dogs" very, very badly.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I think I may have been eight. So this must be '75, '76. And then my dad says, he looks at the cover. And he goes, You know what, you know, we're not going to get this in the house and concern your mother, right? You know this?" And I'm like, "Yeah", and he says, "Can you pick something else?" So I picked "Young Americans."

Aaron Gobler:

Okay.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

Now, I think I had heard "Rebel Rebel" off Diamond Dogs. And that's why I wanted the album. Young Americans actually was just like one of these like, that got me into my love of Bowie.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

And we still joke about that now. My Dad's like, "you got that album? You bring it in the house? "

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. Can you put it like in a in a sleeve that...

Sandie Mack Behrens:

Yeah. Yeah.

Aaron Gobler:

That's funny. That's funny. So I know we've been talking a lot about music and music, how it fits into your life. But in general, do you listen to it like on a whim? Or do you actually like activate that music throughout the day? Find the music you want to play and play it? Or do you just to hear it mostly in the background?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

A little bit of both. I am an active and passive listener. I used to travel a lot for work. I leave at you know, oh dark thirty on Monday, and I come in on Thursdays. And so on the airplane, you know, I would listen to music as I worked. I, I have my earphones in, because it helps me focus. I purposely listen to things actively when I get dressed for my day. And even though we are still in the house, in the house bored, I try to put on clothes and comb my hair and do all those things. And I do that, and I, I will have something on. So it's either, you know, a satellite radio station, or I will ask my player to just randomize everything that's in my library. It also depends upon the mood that I have, if I need something that's going to give me a bit of a boost. I have a playlist of like hype songs to get me through my I think everyone should have a hype song, something that gives them it gives them courage.

Aaron Gobler:

So almost like you have a little like a toolbox in a way like whatever you need to be adjusted. I don't want to say fixed but something you need to be adjusted that, that you get that particular song, and I totally get the idea of like just randomizing stuff. I have a favorites list on Apple Music formerly iTunes that I just tell it to randomize my favorites. And so but if it says if I listened to it straight, it'd be like three days of music. So I haven't listened that long yet. Sandie, you selected three great songs. Two are very well known. And the other is one I'm going to guess is kind of obscure to most of the listeners you chose. "I Want You Back" by the Jackson 5 from 1969, "Me and Bobby McGee", sung by Janis Joplin from 1971 and "Spinning Away" by Brian Eno and John Cale, and that was from 1990. So I'm eager for both of us to listen to these songs together. And I'm interested in knowing why each of them is meaningful to you. So first, we're going to take a listen to "I Want You Back" by the Jackson Five.

Aaron Gobler.:

Sandie, I still have an original 45 of ABC, it's kind of scratched up. But I still have it. And I grew up on Jackson 5's early hits and I really had to watch every Saturday morning their cartoon show. So um, but you know, there's so many fantastic Jackson 5 songs. Why did you choose to include this song?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I just remember being a kid in the back of my parents 1970 Avocado, green Buick Skylark, and this would come on, like it's AM radio. And this would come on, and that intro would make me lose my mind. It just, it was just the immediate happy song and dance. And my parents just thought it was just so cute, precocious. Little did they know. And, you know, and I didn't know all the words yet. And you know, I probably mumbled through half of it. But I would get to that chorus and just belt it and thinking back I believe it was like the birth of my love of harmonies, intros and outros. Because that intro is recognizable everywhere. They hit that first chord. Everybody knows what song this is.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

And then the outro is also just, you know, he's still screaming, you know? And yeah, and it's funny because I'm like, Michael was probably what, 8, 7 to 8 years older than me. I had no idea what I was singing, you know, which is basically about a dude in his fear of missing out once his girlfriend left him for somebody else and now he wants her back. I did not ... that did not become clear to me, I think until I was about 11. Um, but I think it was the melodies it was how the brothers playing their instruments.

Aaron Gobler:

Mm hmm.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

The costumes. I remember just watching them on television being absolutely mesmerized. So this song kind of, is the touchpoint for my 1970s You know, hanging out with my mom and dad, aunties and uncles coming over to have parties, right? It was just like a really even though it was a turbulent time. It was in music. It was it gives me such a great joy. It's in such a great memory.

Aaron Gobler:

You know, I have to say I I've listened to the song hundreds of times and never really concentrated on the very end of it. Because you identify the outro of the song. And I never noticed really until just listening to it now with my little earpiece here that he keeps yelling at the end, he wants you back. That I didn't, I never actually heard that really closely. And then even other parts of the song you just imagine them in these kind of like all matching sequin outfits, five of them lined up in the front, and all leaning in at the same time. And leaning back. The visual just comes flooding right to my brain when I hear those songs.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

Every now and again. I will go and watch the video. I think they were on either some variety show. I can't I can't remember which one exactly. Youtube clip out there for it. And it's just mesmerizing.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

It really is. It's true. Because I think a lot of times

Aaron Gobler:

My mind, also, on a sour note goes to like how they grew up, you know, in their environment, they grew up in that, that their uniformity and their choreography and we look... like we look at our performers and entertainers disciplines was probably also rooted in a lot of an a really, in their Dad's kind of abusive thing. So, yeah, so there's that bittersweet component to it. Yeah. So wow, I took a really currently and even, you know, people like Michael or, or, you nice high feeling down to something a little bit a little dark. (Laughter) So I didn't mean, that was not my intent. I'd like I'd like you know, we would, you know, keeping it real know, any other boy groups or girl groups, and depending upon, in that regard that I do kind of think about that when I when I do see their performances. like, where they started, they lost a lot of themselves in, in Mm hmm. trying to be a performer. You know, you know, to your point.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

You know? Everything kind of hinged on him and the kind of pressure he had. And so, as he morphed into something that was really an unrecognizable, you know, as he It's a great song. But how much of Michael's childhood did he got older, I got it. I understood why, you know, that in the fact that, you know, those were five young brown lose? Because he was basically the breadwinner of the family? faces we saw, right. And the kind of fame that they had was just off the charts. That has to crack somebody's psyche. Nobody can be normal after that.

Aaron Gobler:

One thing about any piece of art is we experience it through our own filters. And we often don't think like, what was Vincent van Gogh going through at the time that he paint, I mean, maybe you're an art historian or something, you might know what somebody was going through, experiencing, what they went through creating what they created, and we just we just enjoy the end result.

Aaron Gobler.:

The the next song on your list is "Me and Bobby McGee" by Janis Joplin and I was trying to find some kind of slick segue from the other song to this and I don't know if I can find that.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I don't think you can. I really don't.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay. So, so, let's take a listen to to that wonderful song written by Kris Kristofferson and sung most famously by Janis Joplin, and then we'll talk about it on the other side.

Aaron Gobler.:

Well, that's certainly a classic. And I'm going to gather that anybody over 30 years old, has heard the song at least once. What inspired you to add this song to your list?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

So my father is a huge Janis Joplin fan. My Dad is also a huge fan of music. And so every Saturday or Sunday, he would pull records out and we would listen to things and he would tell me, you know, about what made particular pieces of music special, but I noticed that this was one of the few songs he actually sang along to. My dad's got a beautiful singing voice, but he doesn't sing very often. And I just remember sitting in the car coloring or doing whatever. And like listening to my dad sing the song. And you know, I kind of in my little young brain, so I think I must have been like closer to five when the song came out. And so I could read by the time I was five, and I had gotten the liner notes. I believe this is from pearl. And that's when they used to have... the liner notes used to have all the lyrics and everything. I asked for help with some of the words because I didn't know all the words.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

And one day, we were sitting in the car. And the song came on because it was still in heavy rotation. And even in '71, or just one day, I was sitting in the car and my dad started singing it and I just started singing along with him. And he encouraged me. And so I would just start singing it around the house without the record. And that that was awesome. So it always gave me a memory of something that my father and I could share. It's just one of the best memories like, you know, sitting in that same, you know, avocado green, Buick Skylark, you know, with the bench seats, singing, especially the end, Na na na na na na na na na. And that part was always just so much fun. Even though the song as I got older, I realized, well, this is just not really an uplifting diddy now is it? But as a kid, I thought that it was the greatest thing because it was something I could share with my dad.

Aaron Gobler.:

Hmm. Do you decide at a particular time just to pull it up and play it? Or is it mostly that you might hear it say, and this has been a theme if you listen to my episodes? Do you hear it in Trader Joe's?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

Every now and again, you'll hear something like that in Trader Joe's and then the first thing I thought is my God, I'm old, right? But then I sing it out loud. And I have fun, you know? I will take the looks from the other people. I don't I do not care. Um, but I also use it like when I'm driving like, I I have, you know, music that I play specifically that I'm taking a road trip. So I might say you know, I haven't heard this in a while. So I'll throw on you know, I'll ask Siri to play all the Big Brother and the Holding Company, you know, and it'll pop up. I learned "Me and Bobby McGee" and then very, very quickly afterwards "Mercedes Benz" because my father thought it was just absolutely hilarious to have a five year old singing, Bowling for dollars has been trying to reach me.

Aaron Gobler:

We're gonna switch gears to a different style of music that is not like the Jackson Five or Janis Joplin. The last song in your list is "Spinning Away" by Brian Eno and John Cale. Let's give it a listen.

Aaron Gobler.:

Sandie, I'd never heard this song before. And at first listen, I hear like music like the Talking Heads who Brian Eno produced for many years. And then I hear vocals like Moody Blues and A-ha, and some Bowie influences and, and hints of Roxy Music, who I just learned today Brian Eno play keyboard for in the 1970s. So what inspired you to include this song in your list?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I had been a John Cale fan for a very, very long time, interestingly enough, not necessarily of Velvet Underground. I like Louis on his own. And the song is incredibly personal. And no matter where I am and what I'm doing, it stops me and I have to listen, you know you don't hear it. You're not gonna hear it in Trader Joe's, that's for sure. But there are a lot of times I put the

Aaron Gobler:

Mm hmm. song on, and cut off all the lights and just listen. My now ex and now deceased ex-husband. This was a song that, you know, we bought, him and I bonded over music. One of the things that we fell in love with each other about was we both had this incredibly eclectic sense of, of music. And it was something that one of the things, one of the many things that we connected on. But, you know, everything isn't always for everyone. And as we grew apart the one thing that did stay somewhat steady state was music. And so we could have a disagreement. Arguments never got loud or crazy, but that there would be disagreements, and we could go out to the back deck, and you know, look up at the night sky, or play the song. And all these years later. It is a melancholy memory, and a really weird story to share, you know, mine. So when I found out that he had passed away, I was on my way to Chicago for work. And so I get into my office, I have a whole bunch of meetings I have to get through. And you know, we hadn't talked to each other in a number of years. And we had worked our way to a place of civility. But we probably weren't going to ever talk again. But, you know, at any decent length, but we were civil. And so when I heard, it still was a gut punch. And I'm, and it still is, to be fair, because you don't stop loving people just because you can't live with them. Um, so I decided that I was going to take a little walk just to clear my head. And so I picked up my, my phone and I picked up my headphones. I popped them in, and I hit shuffle. And this was the first song that played was "Spinning Away". So I'm, you know, I'm a spiritual person, not religious. But I always just thought that was him saying, Hmm, okay. Yeah. And like, and like you said, you hello. don't, this is not a song, you're generally just going to hear out-of-the-blue. And do you do seek it out? Do you play it?

Sandie Mack Behrens:

Oh, I do. I do. Yeah. Um, like, there was a time that I was coming back from a friend's house, and the stars are just out and just look beautiful. And I came in and I played it. Um, I just think it's one of those songs is well, the song is about Vincent van Gogh. And we mentioned Van Gogh.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

And this is about Vincent van Gogh, and his drawing of Starry Night. And the spinning away is talking about like how the, the art kind of spin the, the arts kind of like is that that swirl. And you see the pattern spinning, spinning away from the center. And when you think about it, you also think about, you know, how two people are together, and, you know, can also spin away from each other. So I always, you know, it'll it has a very, very special place in my heart.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, thank you, thank you for, for that for for that story. It's a very heartfelt story. And it does underscore the power that that music has to, to bring our minds back to a different time and place and, and it seems like now, inexorably connected to, to your thoughts about your ex-husband.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I think it's really important that I look at music as being like the soundtrack of my life. Right? Like, I remember, you know, what albums were in heavy rotation. You know, the year was my son was born. And, you know, what was on the radio when I got my first real job, right? And my first real heart ache, or, you know, it is the soundtrack. And, and I think that's really important. And I think music helps us hammer down those memories. Because we don't always are able to either enunciate what we remember very well. And sometimes the music helps us do that in a way that is, you know, a little bit more straightforward, I guess.

Aaron Gobler:

Mm hmm. Yeah, I'm, I'm envisioning the old school car radio where you had to push the button in manually to like lock a station to that button. And so we're talking about music here. It's almost like certain songs get attached to if you think of like the radio band as being a timeline, and that certain songs are like that button attached to the to that, but I guess it works in the reverse order that you hear that song? I guess they can work both ways. You hear that song? And it brings and it brings back the memory of that particular time on your timeline? Or you kind of punch that button in to to bring you back to that particular time? Yeah, yeah. It's pretty remarkable. So is there anything about the three songs you chose that you thought about as we're talking or as you're listening to them that we haven't talked about yet? Yes.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I was noodling about that. I know this is gonna you know, someone will probably ask why did I wake up and choose violence, but I think all the songs that I chose, show But I also think that some of it just feels a craftsmanship of music that we don't always see anymore. Like we talked about the layers of, of, you know, organ and piano and vocals in "Me and Bobby McGee", and we talked about the intro and outro, right, of "I Want You Back" in the harmonies. And the same thing that "Spinning Away" is an incredibly simple song. Right? No more than three or four words, it seems. Right. And, but the craftsmanship in that music and the heart, it felt like music was being made for the art of it. And not necessarily for the commodity. Even though the commodity did come eventually, if that makes sense. And like these days, it just feels like the music is made for the commodification. And you have to really dig to find new artists that have a different kind of feeling. You know, don't get me wrong. I like Cardi B. I like Megan Thee Stallion. I like I like that music. But there's also a lot of things that, you know, and of course, it's generational, right, just like my father used to tell me, you know, to turn Kool Moe Dee down or Siouxsie and the Banshees, right? I'm, I'm looking at, you know, some of these, these new artists, and I don't quite understand. And I understand that it's not for me to understand. the music feels more transactional than a shared experience with the audience.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. And I think that that applies to a lot of different types of art, some art is very beautiful to look at. And some is just so deep and complex that you could just get lost in just looking at it for a long time. And I've often thought of things as kind of like, like a bubble gum, where you'd like it tastes really sweet at the first time you're you hear it or you want to hear it, you know, a few times and then it doesn't really doesn't really hold itself after you know, it doesn't really last, that magic about it doesn't last. And then the fact that my daughters love a lot of Beatles music. And some of that's just like these songs were so well put together. And we don't we can't necessarily identify why they're really great. But they do they last through all time.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

Yeah. I think it's interesting, because I have a friend of mine, we've become really good friends in like the last few years and there is there's a 30 year age difference. She's 30 years younger than me. And so it is a very funny dynamic, right? Because I'm old enough to be her mother, but I'm her friend.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay, right.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

And so we're in the car, and she just turned to me one day, it's do you listen to anything that came out before I was born? And I say, you know, you can also get the hell out of my car. You can do that too. Right? It was hilarious. And when she when she becomes older, she'll get it because this is where like your memories are formed in 17, 18. You know, between 14 18 20 Right? That's when you're sucking everything in. And I think someone told me that when nursing homes play music, or assisted livings communities play music, they play music from that generation, the group generations teens, right? Always make the joke, like they're gonna be playing like Joy Division and like Siouxsie and the Banshees, all this Bowie, right? It was just gonna be like a really hoppin' nursing home experience. Um, but I think it's, it's the, it's the craftsmanship of the songs. It's the connection, it's the lyrics. It's the layering, right? And maybe some people listen to, I mean, I think there's people who listen to music passively, and they consume it like bubblegum. And then when they get tired, they toss it out, like put in another piece. But I think that there are those of us who can say, Yeah, I first heard this song when I was five. And I heard this song again last week. And in those, you know, X amount of years that have passed, you know, it still holds up.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. And then we may not really know necessarily why it holds up, but, but it really just underscores how some of these things are really pieces of art. Well, Sandie, I've had a great time talking with you. And you it's clear that music is such a significant part of your life. And and really that came through in our conversation and and I had a lot of fun at the same time.

Sandie Mack Behrens:

I had a tremendous amount of fun. And, you know, it was a it was great to talk about to music with a peer and not get lambasted. And so I appreciate that and thank you for the opportunity. It was a blast. That would be a very interesting

Aaron Gobler:

Oh, you're welcome in I promise not to embarrass experiment. I'm interested to see how this plays out. anybody about their music choices. I may I may think things after the interview, but I will not say them in the recording. (Laughter) But, yeah, but going back to what you would said earlier on, it really is true. I guess when you're talking with your contemporary it is a safer, it is a safer space. And I am hoping to bring on some younger folks to Okay. Thanks. Thank you. So thank you again, interview even if I don't know any of the artists or songs that Sandie. It's been a blast and and to my listeners if you want they choose. I'll be open minded there. to be part of the show, start by going to our website Aaron's Radio dot show and clicking on the My Three Songs button on the homepage. You can also sign up for our mailing lists so you'll know immediately when a new episode is available.

Aaron Gobler.:

Until next time, keep your ears and mind open and let more music into your world.

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