Aaron’s Radio Show

Episode 59

My Three Songs with Steve Johgart

 

Notes

Episode Notes

EPISODE 59 – My Three Songs with Steve Johgart  Welcome, everyone, to Episode 59. This is the 49th in our series of episodes called My Three Songs where my guest chooses three memorable songs and we listen to the songs and talk about why they are meaningful to my guest. Steve Johgart is a retired professional, with a real passion for music, and sharing new songs with others. We had a great time listening to and discussing three meaningful songs for him, including “Jubilee” by Mary Chapin Carpenter.

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Three Songs

  1. Jubilee – Mary Chapin Carpenter (1994)
  2. It Will Come to You Again – David Buskin (1972)
  3. Box of Rain – Grateful Dead (1970)

Aaron’s Radio Show has been licensed by ASCAP and BMI to include songs from their repertories in performances on this website.

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Transcript

This transcript was originally generated using artificial intelligence ("AI") software. It has been edited by a human being, but it may still contain some misspellings, lack necessary punctuation, or include other anomalies. We are regularly working to improve our transcripts!


Jake:

Coming to you almost live from Berkeley, California, it's Aaron's Radio Show, with your host, Aaron Gobler.

Aaron Gobler:

Thanks, Jake. And welcome, everybody to Episode 59. Welcome to My Three Songs where I play three special songs chosen by my guest, and we talk about why they chose each song. Today, my guest is Steve Johgart. Steve is a retired professional who maintains aspirations of being a professional disc jockey, and he's lent his talents to emceeing several music festivals in Michigan. Welcome to the show, Steve, how are you today?

Steve Joghart:

I'm doing well today. It's a beautiful day. I'm actually down in North Carolina right now. It's a nice day down here now, it rained a little while ago.

Aaron Gobler:

And is it significantly different climate wise than Ann Arbor, Michigan?

Steve Joghart:

Well, I'm up in the mountains. And it's actually interesting. As far as temperature goes, it's a little warmer, usually. But very similar. We don't have the every afternoon rain showers that we seem to get in Ann Arbor. We don't have the rain showers we seem to get down here in North Carolina.

Aaron Gobler:

And what do you find yourself doing mostly when you're, you know, vacationing or relaxing where you are?

Steve Joghart:

I relax. One thing I do, I try to take a three mile walk every day and down here there are all kinds of places to go and take three mile walk so that's something I do.

Aaron Gobler:

Steve, you're you're one of several guests that I've interviewed who found out about the show through my conversation with Christine Lavin from Episode 54. What inspired you to be guest yourself?

Steve Joghart:

She sends out you know, an email newsletter periodically, or an email update of what she's doing. And she mentioned your show and gave information about how to be on it. And I but you know, hey, I've got some favorite songs. And it'd be fun to talk about them. Talking about music is fun. And, and I always wanted to be a disc jockey, which of course, part of that is talking about songs. It's like it's a chance to pretend to be a disc jockey being interviewed or something. It's hard to say exactly. It just sounded like a lot of fun. I thought it would be a cool thing to do.

Aaron Gobler:

Well, I hope by the end of the interview and the release of the show that I've done justice to your wishes to be semi famous on the radio.

Steve Joghart:

(Laughter) Yeah, well, yeah, that would be good. Yeah.

Aaron Gobler:

I'm not saying that I am full famous. But I'd say I'm probably somewhere in this semi-famous among the people who listen to the show.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, well, you're, you're really famous among people who listen to the show.

Aaron Gobler:

(Laughter) Yeah.

Steve Joghart:

I listen to a couple of podcasts and those people are famous to me. I've actually had a thought, if I were ever to be a professional DJ, and I'm 70 years old. So that's unlikely. I've had this thought of a show format which is similar. Part of it would be for me, where I do say a two or three hour show once a week. And I have 52 years. So you got years from say 1960 through 2011 in a like a hat. At the end of each show you draw a year and you've got another year, and you do a show about music from that year, but not hits.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay.

Steve Joghart:

Like the broad spectrum of what was going on in that year. It'd be interesting for me as much as possibly for an audience because I'd have to do research and find out what the heck was going on. And for a lot of those years, I really don't know. So it would be really interesting exercise for everybody. So I can understand where you're coming from.

Aaron Gobler:

In some ways, it sounds kind of hokey, like, you know, we're just gonna pick this year, and we're going to talk about songs for that year. But obviously, people are born at all different times during all different years. And so what year or what chunk of time you choose for those songs can be very meaningful to a particular person, because that was very formative time or an intense time or whatever. And so it's got more poignancy and meaning than just scattershot songs across a variety of times.

Steve Joghart:

And part of the idea would be you talk a little bit about the song on what might have influenced then where music went from there. So you got a continuity to it in that respect.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. What is very powerful when I've gotten a lot of positive feedback about this show is stories people have. And that was really my goal from the very beginning was because so many songs in my life, so many times I can hear a song and immediately brought back or transported my mind to that time. And I even had a guest that said that when she heard "Brown Eyed Girl," she actually could smell this field, wherever it was she was. Her school organized something, and they were outside. And she just connects that song with that smell. So it's amazing how our brains can kind of shift so quickly to that. And that's kind of what I'm trying to capture here is how a song can bring back a time, place feeling, etc. And, and then people have stories about them.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, that's interesting, right? Or yeah, what, what's the significance? But yeah, sure. And all three of the songs I picked, of course, are songs out of my past that for one reason or another, I've just really loved that song. And interestingly, thematically, they're all actually fairly similar. The first two I knew were fairly similar. But "Box of Rain", I picked it because the song that I was going to pick, you weren't licensed to play. So I had to pick another one. I guess I'll do "Box of Rain". And then I realized later things, I was like, Oh, that was perfect, because it fits the same thematic trajectory of the first few songs. It was pretty cool.

Aaron Gobler:

Nice. Well, I will get to that list in a moment. I want to give you an opportunity now and for my listeners to get a glimpse into what your disc jockeying career at your dormitory, which is what you told me you've done, can you spin the record backwards in your mind and remember what might be like what you would do on that or what song you might be playing in that show?

Steve Joghart:

Most of the songs I don't remember, but I do remember because I was a brand new Deadhead in those days. Brand new, I first saw the Grateful Dead at Michigan State. And just like the spring before, and I'd seen them a couple of times, but "Sugar Magnolia" we had 45 of "Sugar Magnolia", so I played that. But it was not my ideal situation because it was a dorm radio station. Okay, they played, they played the music over the wires of the dorm. They didn't even have a broadcast tower or anything. It just it was just FM through the wires as the dorm to the rooms in the dorm. I had no idea if anybody ever listened to my show. But I had fun. The station manager there was an aspiring station manager. So he had a playlist and we had a set of 45s, we were expected to play six or seven songs from that collection of 45s and I think we were allowed to play either two or three songs of our own choosing of any kind. But it was still fun. It was still fun. I would have rather been able to bring in my albums and I also liked a much broader spectrum of things and like to try to turn people on to cool songs they probably haven't heard. And I would have loved to have done more of that. But I didn't get to do that. But it but it was a lot of fun. And I always had my own special little closing to the show and I did get to do one one hour show on the campus wide student radio station. That was a lot of fun. And my friends were supposed to tape it for me, but their tape recorder didn't work. There is no tape of that show.

Aaron Gobler:

We've got to take your word for it. Unless any witnesses were...

Steve Joghart:

I had people tell me it was really interesting, too. I had a lot of fun putting that one together.

Aaron Gobler:

And then no disc jockeying since then?

Steve Joghart:

No, no, nope. I emcee folk festivals, that's as close as I come.

Aaron Gobler:

Well I'm really delighted to get the story from you about your disc jockey career, limited disc jockey career.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah. So yeah, I actually did, I guess I did kind of a disc jockey thing for a while on Facebook. I used to post three or four years while I was still working. But before I retired, I'd post a link to a song on YouTube every day one song and I'd say a little something about it. I usually create for myself a theme of the week and try to find cool songs that would fit, that was fun to do. And I use links to YouTube because I didn't want to get in copyright trouble and get put in Facebook Jail for posting my posting songs directly to Facebook. Well, it depends on what I'm doing. I believe when I'm around the house, I don't kind of think of putting music on, which is weird because music used to be constantly on when I was in college and, and after college, places I lived were never silent. Somebody was always playing music. And I don't do that a whole lot at home. But if I'm in the, in the car, I either listen to NPR, the talk shows, or I'll listen to something off my YouTube playlist. And I try to walk three miles every day. And I always, almost, occasionally I'll listen to Good Ol' Grateful Deadcast or some podcast. But I usually listen to music off my iTunes playlist when I'm walking, which I really enjoy, and hear new music because I'm always adding new music to my iTunes playlist. And I have a playlist called, "Never Played", to make sure everything I put into iTunes I at least hear once.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay.

Steve Joghart:

I put music in there either because I buy CDs at concerts or I get to see great deals on the internet. I just bought a 10 CD set of old Tom Waits radio broadcasts from the 70s. So I'm working my way through that. Or I have a subscription to E Music, which has all kinds of things I've never heard of. And pretty much entirely things haven't heard of. So I discovered new music that way. But I load up that playlist, and then I'll put that on shuffle and when I go walk, but I almost never get to the point where I played that whole playlist, so I can go back and listen to all the albums and old music and so on. But I ty to do that now and then too.

Aaron Gobler:

So Steve, let's jump right into your songs. You had mentioned a couple already. The songs you chose were "Jubilee" by Mary Chapin Carpenter from 1994. "It Will Come to You Again" by David Buskin from 1972. And "Box of Rain" by the Grateful Dead from 1970. Steve, I'm eager for us to listen to your songs together, and to discuss the significance of each song to you. So let's jump into your first song "Jubilee" by Mary Chapin Carpenter.

Aaron Gobler.:

Steve, "Jubilee" is really a beautiful song. And it strikes me as like a great fusion of folk and country music. But after some research I did on Carpenter, I discovered she does not like to be pigeonholed into any particular genre. What inspired you to include this song on your list?

Steve Joghart:

Well, I think that's I think that's probably right about Mary Chapin Carpenter. I don't see her as any particular genre. But the song is really, really meaningful to me, because my wife for a long time, I've always thought the song could have been written for her. I mean it's, I don't mean to bum people out. But it's, it's she was always a kind of extreme introvert. And I kind of got the feeling that she was like, Well, I don't, I'm not comfortable having all these friends because I'm really not there yet. And, but eventually, she got attacked by depression, you know, which is just a devil, just a devil, and then used alcohol to, to deal with that, and, and really got to the point where I mean, we're saying, "I can tell by the way you're walking, you don't want company". It's just I like this song, the song works so well, because it's a recognition that you know what, I can't fix it. I can't make this better for you. It's, it's, I'm just another person here. I can't make this better for you. I can't fix you. But I want you to know that I'm always here. And anytime you want to reach out, and it's not just me, you have friends, you have people that love you in the world. Anytime you you want to come and and be with us, we want you to come and be with us. You know, we will celebrate, but we can't fix you. You know, this is something you have to go through. And there's a there's a line in there that says, "we're all like frail boats on the sea". We've all been there to some degree. There's some place at some point we have really felt alone, we have really felt like what the hell am I doing what is going on? And it's kind of understand your're not even alone in your feelings. It's just, it's more extreme in your case, but you're not alone.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, I hear what you're saying. I think the most we can do is be there and be supportive, like you said and let someone know that they have a support net, right. But there's only so much you can do like you said exactly. You know, people are their own person.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, you can't just... trying to drag someone into their support network. It's like, counterproductive. It just doesn't, you can't do it. It's like telling someone, they have to have surgery and you're gonna lay them down on the table and cut them open. No, they have to realize... I like more thinking about something not working right than something wrong. That's sounds, sounds somehow judgmental, even though it's not meant to be.

Aaron Gobler:

And so it's not all happening in a vacuum, right? Because all the people who really care about the, the other person, part of that other person is part of them. And sounds like they're, you know, highly empathetic to that person. And it hurts. It definitely hurts them each, you know, when this person is, is having trouble.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, you can really hear that in the way Mary Chapin Carpenter sings that song, you can hear that, though, wishing she could do more. I understand how you feel. And I want to be there with you. But you really hear the pain and the love and in her voice that she sings the song. It's just a wonderful song.

Aaron Gobler:

And then her use of the word "Jubilee" is not necessarily, you know, a particular event like some town might have a jubilee celebration or something. Do you feel that she's using it as some kind of metaphor or allegory?

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, I always think of it as the point at which you really experience being fully alive. You know, and alive, particularly since she keeps talking about the people who love you and the people, that she's talking about being fully alive and being fully alive in the company of others who aren't being fully alive.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, because just listening to it casually, at least for me, the first time I listen to it, was just thinking of a Jubilee and not thinking of it in the way, you know, that you're describing in terms of the definition of the word.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, I never thought of it as it's going to be a big party, but a being much more. We're all here for each other. And isn't that a wonderful thing? Look at the ... look how wonderful. You can do it, too. We're inviting you. But we can't make you come.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah. And I think in the mind of a lot of people who are suffering, they feel like they're actually a burden. As much as the others try to say that they're not.

Steve Joghart:

Right, right. I think that's true. And whether that was true in my wife's case, depression, kind of, I know, from reading about it, and what I know about it, I've never experienced it to that degree, but it's, you don't even care enough to think about whether it matters. It's just, you're just there. You know, it sounds like it's just just a terrible thing. And alcoholism, of course, is just the devil. It's terrible. It's interesting, Christine Lavin who, as you mentioned, her email after she was on your show that inspired me to come on the show. And she has probably the best song I know about, more specifically about having a friend who was an alcoholic. Really, really sad, wonderful song, it just nails it listening to that song. "Until Now", I think is the name of the song, great song.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, it's one thing about human nature, and this can go for something in terms of humor or, or sad things as well, is that we often think that we're having unique experiences or kind of insulated, when it's actually an experience that so many other people have had, and you know, in a joke that someone makes, or a meme on Facebook, and you're like, yeah, the exactly, you know, or in this case, you know, someone actually can encapsulate the feeling and the energy or lack of energy or whatever, around the particular thing that we go-- that many of us go through in life and put it into some kind of poem or song and become super powerful.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, yeah. I mean, one thing I realized, just while I was listening to the song, I listened to the song again, right before and one thing that struck me too, is, you know, this song also reminds me that there are all these people out there that love me. And if I'm, you know, I, that's a really wonderful thing to have somewhere in your head, when you're starting to feel lonely or isolated are kinda like, what the hell's going on? So is not just for someone else. Yeah.

Aaron Gobler:

That's a good point. Yeah, there are people who are... who may be thinking about you at this particular moment. You know, we don't know. We don't know.

Steve Joghart:

Right, right. But I there's, you know, there are people that are always happy to see you. And that's true for pretty much everybody.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes.

Steve Joghart:

Probably everybody, actually.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah. Well, thank you so much for the very personal and touching story about this song and it seems extraordinarily poignant to you.

Steve Joghart:

Tears in my eyes every time I listen to it, and I've listened to it a lot of times. It still gets me.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, kind of bittersweet. Steve, the next song on your list is "It Will Come to You Again" by David Buskin. So let's give that a listen and we'll talk about it on the other side.

Aaron Gobler.:

Steve, I'd never heard of David Buskin before. But after some research, I did some research about these songs, I discovered that many popular artists, including Judy Collins, Peter, Paul and Mary, Johnny Mathis, and Roberta Flack have recorded some of his songs. So why did you choose to include the song on your list?

Steve Joghart:

to put albums on. But record companies didn't know that they just knew we were a radio station. So they'd send us all these promo albums. And they just get piled up in the back room with well, it didn't even need a note, we just all knew, go through these if there's any you want, take them because we don't have room for them. And the David Buskin album was one that I found, there are a number of great, some great music, I discovered that nobody's ever heard of David Buskin, that David Buskin album was one of them. And then he came and actually played in East Lansing three or four times, and I always went to his concerts, his concerts were as wonderful as the album is, just great shows.

Aaron Gobler:

And lyrically, the song I've only listened to it a few times now. But each time I listen to it, I realize it really is pretty dense with lyrics. Do you have any thoughts on the on the meaning of lyrics in the song?

Steve Joghart:

It's similar in a lot of ways to "Jubilee" in that, again, it's a song to someone going through some kind of serious crisis, either depression or some sort of accident or something that's really left them traumatized, some kind of trauma. And again, it's a recognition that I can't fix it, I can't make you better. You know, I want to do something for you, what have I got, I've got music I can, I can give you music, I will give you these songs. And what I like about this song is it not only is it a wonderful song about empathy, and love and care for another person, it's also a really wonderful song, about music, about what music does for us, if I'm feeling down, I'll put on some music. And let that person sing to me just like Buskin is talking about singing to this specific person he's singing to, and I like his line of "follow where it leads, or turn in any way you want to, make it what you need". Because a song isn't just one thing that's concrete, this is exactly what it means, it can mean all kinds of things, just like any kind of art. I remember, a teacher in high school talking about writing to E. E. Cummings, and asking what one of his poems meant, and his response was, "Not being a critic, I don't expect my poems to mean the same thing to any two people, or even any one person twice". And that's kind of what Buskin is saying when he says, "turn in any way you want to." I'm not gonna tell you what the song means I'm just gonna sing you some songs, whatever you need to get out of them. That's what I want you to do. And it just the magic of music really comes through in that song. And I just, I love that aspect of it.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, and as you're saying that about the song can mean different things to different people. And I feel like we all vibrate at different wavelengths. And so certain songs will kind of meet that, that vibe, even at different times different songs, but nobody's wavelength is exactly the same. And again, that could change in a person over a period of time or minutes or hours. If it's if it's too on-the-nose, then it's not really necessarily art. And the more maybe perhaps the more interpretable it is, I would say some people might look at Jackson Pollock's artwork and say that this looks crazy, and that doesn't require any skill, but somebody else might look at that and go I can completely like get the vibe from this, you know?

Steve Joghart:

Yeah, no, I think that's right. I think really, really great art will reach different people in different ways. I think that's right. You look at it and go "Oh". You know, and somebody else's say "I see it this way" and you go "I never looked at it that way. I can see how you might see it that way. But that's not how I see it. I see it this way."

Aaron Gobler:

Right. It also underscores for me if you talk to somebody about a movie and they say they hate it, but then you talk to someone else and they say they love it, then it's probably something you should see.

Steve Joghart:

Right.

Aaron Gobler:

Because it means it's not bubblegum. It means it's something about it that really touched somebody a certain way and somebody else another way.

Steve Joghart:

You never know which side you're going to come out on when you do that, but it's probably at least going to be interesting to think about how could anybody have loved this movie? How can anybody hate this movie? This is the best thing. Songs are the same way. Songs, bands, everything, you know?

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah.

Steve Joghart:

But I'm an old Deadhead and I know people who just don't like the Grateful Dead at all. I'm like, Well, okay, you know, I I kind of understand not liking their concerts because long jams are an acquired taste. I love them. But I can understand people do not. But some of their songs are still good.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. Yes, that's a great segue into the third song, which is Grateful Dead song, as you mentioned before, and that's "Box of Rain". So let's give that a listen.

Aaron Gobler.:

Steve, this is the third Dead song I've included on the show. I'll admit, I didn't know the other two Dead songs that guests chose. And I'd never heard this one before either. I really, really enjoyed it. So thank you for having it on your list. I'm eager to know what inspired you to include this song on your list?

Steve Joghart:

Well, it's just always been a favorite song of mine, one of my absolute favorite, Grateful Dead songs, even though I don't think they've ever done a 25 minute jam "Box of Rain". But it's such a beautiful song. And much more abstract than typical. Mary Chapin Carpenter song is somewhat abstract, but you still pretty well get what she's, where she's going with it and kind of what she's talking about. The Buskin song is pretty straightforward. It's just wonderful. He just expresses it so beautifully. And, and the music in it the whole song is so beautiful. This song is typical for Robert Hunter lyrics. Don't try to solidify what he's trying to say with most of his song. It's like Bob Dylan songs or Leonard Cohen songs, you understand what he's saying even though you could not ever tell anybody what it means.

Aaron Gobler:

Right. Okay.

Steve Joghart:

And it probably means something very different to each person that hears it. Like we were, as we were talking about a little earlier. And this song is like that. It was apparently written when Phil's dad was dying. So it was had something to do with that experience he was going through, but he didn't write the... Hunter wrote the lyrics. So I'm not sure exactly how but thematically it's really similar to the first two songs in that, again, you get this in pieces in it. It's like, you know, what do you want me to do? I you know, I'm just another person here. I'm not a miracle worker. Probably my favorite line of the whole song is, "What do you want me to do / to watch for you while you're sleeping? / Well, please don't be surprised / if you find me dreaming, too." You know, I'm just another person here. I'm going through stuff too, you know, I want to share it with you. Share this experience of life with you. And I want to share what it is you're going through. It's just... "Box of Rain" probably one of the one of the real enigmas of Dead lyrics is what the heck is a box of rain? I don't have an answer. You get a clue at the end when it talks about "sun and shower, wind and rain, in and out the window". It's like looking out the window at rain. It's it's like a box of rain there. But I don't know that that's at all what Hunter had in mind when wrote the lyric.

Aaron Gobler:

Similar to the E. E. Cummings remark, you know, maybe it was written as being just creating some kind of neutral visual for you. Because even if you were to have a box to contain the rain, when we think of a box, we think of like what cardboard or something that's going to probably get all soggy, right? So if you think even if you were to think of a plastic box of rain, it's like what what exactly is that? So I think it's like you're able to then project onto that whatever it is, you know, here is this, this box of rain, maybe there's something in there that you can use or maybe not. And if not, then maybe it's some some other person can make use of it or something.

Steve Joghart:

Yeah. Believe it if you need it if you don't just pass it on somebody else. Yeah.

Aaron Gobler:

And like maybe he was really like in some kind of altered state when he wrote this and it just was already just some kind of like obtuse...

Steve Joghart:

That couldn't be the Dead were never in altered states. (Laughter) They would've never done something like that. (Laughter)

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, I mean, it could have been purposefully obtuse so that you are allowed to project into that box, whatever, because a box of rain. Rain is rain. I mean, what what else? Is it right? It's not like, it's almost a passive thing, where it's like, you know, thunder and lightning or things that are much more intense. But rain is just rain.

Steve Joghart:

That's interesting. Yeah, that's interesting way of looking at it. Yeah. Yeah, it's just is what it is. Yeah.

Aaron Gobler:

So you had suggestedat the very beginning of our conversation about there being a theme across the songs. And so what I'm feeling from this is, is about how we interact with others, and how we can empathize with others, and try to help them. But ultimately, it's up to them to kind of help themselves. Is that a good reading of it? Or how would you describe your theme?

Steve Joghart:

Kind of. Well, yeah, that's reasonably right. It's, it's, again, it's, "Please don't be surprised, if you find me dreaming too". You know, I'm here with you, but I'm not going to do ... there's nothing extraordinary I can do, I can just be here for you. That's what I can do. That in itself is fairly extraordinary. But it's, it's nothing you can't do. It's, you know, we're all in this thing together. And I'll do what I can. And I, you know, and it's always, all three of the songs are really an expression to somebody that you really care about them. You know, there's, there's a lot, there's a love and all through all of these songs. And it's, it's really nice to be able to share these things. Another way I kind of did my disc jockey thing is I love to make mix CDs, Music Mix CDs, I just love doing it. And it gets to the point where if I'm listening to music, and concerts sometimes too, I'll hear a song, in my mind, I'll go off on, oh, this would be good sequence with this song and this song, we could put this theme together, this would make a great CD. And I like CDs better than playlists, because they're finite. I mean, they have they have a specific link. So you have to pick out a specific set of songs that fits in that little box. And I had a girlfriend probably for four years, I would make her a mix CD every month. And I really look forward to making those I love doing that. So you know, that's my little way of reaching out to people. And, again, let the music take you, follow wherever it leads.

Aaron Gobler:

Well, I want to thank you, Steve for taking the time to be on the show today and providing me your list. And I really enjoyed our conversation and, and experiencing these three songs that I had not heard before. And I imagine you had a good time yourself, too.

Steve Joghart:

It's been really fun doing this because part of it was maybe turn a few people on to these songs that I think are so great. It never worked well at all, because I used to try to play things at parties and things. But I tried to play these obscure oddball things and people are like, No, we just want to hear good party songs. We don't want to hear that song. Rats, but these are such good songs. I want people to appreciate them. And there's a good chance here because these are good songs, particularly the David Buskin song, which is just I say, within very recent times has been made available at all digitally. So it's been years since anybody has been able to share that song. So it's really a thrill for me, and hopefully somebody listening to your show is gonna go. Wow, that was cool. Thank you for turning me on to that song. Because I just think it's a wonderful song.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it is a beautiful song. So Steve, before I sign off on this episode, I'd like to hear what your sign off was for your dorm radio.

Steve Joghart:

My sign off from my radio show back when the I was in Shaw Hall doing a radio show. I always ended it with the New Riders of the Purple Sage song "Rainbow". But before I played that song I always signed off with, "Always remember, with the storm comes the rainbow. And if you look real close, you'll see that rainbow is just a reflection of you."

Aaron Gobler:

Okay, so thanks again and to my listeners, if you want to be part of the show, start by going to our website, Aaron's Radio dot show and clicking on the My Three Songs button on the homepage. You can also sign up for our mailing list so you'll know immediately when a new episode is available. You can also find Aaron's Radio Show on your favorite podcast service, but the podcast episodes only include interviews and no licensed music.

Aaron Gobler.:

So until next time, keep your ears and mind open and let more music into your world.

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