Aaron’s Radio Show

Episode 62

My Three Songs with Joanne Kaufmann

 

Notes

Episode Notes

EPISODE 62 – My Three Songs with Joanne Kaufmann  Welcome, everyone, to Episode 62. This is the 52nd in our series of episodes called My Three Songs where my guest chooses three memorable songs and we listen to the songs and talk about why they are meaningful to my guest. Joanne Kaufmann and her husband, Kris, are passionate about performing and listening to music. They both are avid concert attenders. We had a great time listening to and discussing three meaningful songs for her, including “Sacred Book of Favorite Days” by Todd Sucherman.

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Three Songs

  1. When the Coast is Clear – Jimmy Buffett (1986)
  2. Sacred Book of Favorite Days – Todd Sucherman (2020)
  3. Back to You – Steve Porcaro (2016)

Aaron’s Radio Show has been licensed by ASCAP and BMI to include songs from their repertories in performances on this website.

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Transcript

This transcript was originally generated using artificial intelligence ("AI") software. It has been edited by a human being, but it may still contain some misspellings, lack necessary punctuation, or include other anomalies. We are regularly working to improve our transcripts!


Jake:

Coming to you almost live from Berkeley, California, it's Aaron's Radio Show with your host, Aaron Gobler.

Aaron Gobler:

Thanks, Jake. And welcome, everybody to Episode 62. Welcome to My Three Songs where I play three special songs chosen by my guest, and we talk about why they chose each song. Today, my guest is Joanne Kaufmann, and she's joined today by her husband Kris. Joanne is a marketing strategist with a large healthcare organization in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. And Kris is a media specialist with a school district in suburban Pittsburgh. Listeners may remember Joanne and Kris from Episode 55, where we focused on Kris' songs. Today we'll be talking about Joanne's list of songs. Welcome to the show, Joanne and Kris, how are you today?

Joanne Kaufmann:

We're great. Thank you, Aaron. How are you doing?

Aaron Gobler:

I'm doing well. I'm experiencing a gorgeous day in Berkeley. And we're expecting a tremendous amount of rain over the next several days, which is quite unique because we haven't had rain in like months.

Joanne Kaufmann:

We're having very similar weather but ours is just going to start getting cooler and not rain. Could not ask for more glorious day than today.

Aaron Gobler:

And would you say Pittsburgh is a very comfortable place to live in terms of climate and the seasons?

Kris Kaufmann:

It can get uncomfortably muggy in the summertime. But winters are a bit milder than what we experienced in northwestern Pennsylvania. So we'll take that trade off.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah, we joke we moved here for the balmy climate because the winds aren't biting and we don't have feet of snow from like, November 1st through mid March. It's a nice climate here except for a couple months in the summer just gets a very humid.

Aaron Gobler:

And Kris, you said uncomfortably muggy? Is there such a thing as comfortably muggy? Is there a good muggy?

Kris Kaufmann:

(Laughter) You know, I don't think so.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay. So Joanne, I've been following your Facebook posts about the concerts you've been attending. So I'd like to know can you like share some something about one or two of them?

Joanne Kaufmann:

I think the first one would be, that I could share about, would be last night we saw Elton John's farewell Goodbye Yellow Brick Road tour, or Farewell Yellow Brick Road, for the second time. So he's like doing a tour after a tour. So he's kind of like baiting and switching us on that first one...

Kris Kaufmann:

The yellow brick road is circular.

Joanne Kaufmann:

There you go. I like that. As usual, Elton put on an amazing show. If this really is his last tour so he can focus on his family, we feel very lucky to have seen him again. Because over the years he has just gotten better and better. In the 70s, his shows were very wild and very much visual spectacles. As he's gotten older, that aspect has really gone away and it's really all about the songs and the musicianship and you just cannot you can't beat Elton. As a friend said last night, the concert's legendary. We got to see Santana finally after two years of COVID related delays, and then another delay when the poor man collapsed on stage in Michigan due to the heat. We finally got to see Carlos Santana. I had seen him in 1983. And that was the last time I'd seen him. Seeing him now and the band he has it was it was spectacular. And I am an aspiring drummer. I'll be ready to audition for the nursing home band by the time I'm proficient but his wife Cindy Blackman Santana is an incredibly accomplished, well known drummer and to be able to see her drum was really almost life altering experience for me. It is amazing to watch her, I say this about many drummers, and sometimes I think that being a drummer is not solely being musician, it's also being an athlete because of everything involved physically. And she really exemplifies that athleticism.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes. Wow. Well, thank you for sharing that, Joanne. I know you both go to a lot of concerts, and I'm really enjoying reading about your experiences on Facebook. So keep keep that going.

Joanne Kaufmann:

We have a fan!

Aaron Gobler:

(Laughter) Yeah. Yeah, I'm a groupie of you guys go to concerts. Joanne, since you and Kris were on the show a few months ago, since that time, is there anything you wish you had talked about then? Is there something you want to add today?

Joanne Kaufmann:

I think since the last time we talked, and you'd asked me if I would want to be on this show, I immediately started working on my list of three songs. And when you start looking at the music that has been the soundtrack of your life, it is incredibly hard to pick three songs, I had a list, and that list changed and it changed again. And now I just like have a running list of songs. But it's really, it really made me appreciate, although I always have known that music has always been there for me. But when you start looking at your favorite songs, and why they're your favorite songs, or why they're meaningful to you, it really it's kind of like time travel in a way. Okay, this was this is song is so meaningful to me, because of X, Y or Z that was going on in my life at that time. And then this one over here, it's really meaningful for me, but it's another time. So it was in doing that it was like I was going everywhere from the 60s to the 2000s and the 2010s 2020s, just trying to come up with this list. And it was almost in ways like looking through a scrapbook of my life because I was able to link so much of of what was going on in my life based upon what songs there were. And I'm just a weirdo, because I know when we get together with friends for holidays, or whatever. And if we play Trivial Pursuit, I can always come up with answers. And they're like, how did you know this? And it's like, because I know what songs were popular at the time or what was meaningful to me and it makes Kris nuts. It let me see how music shaped my life, how music is linked to almost every important what I'll call tentpole experiences in my life. And I think that's probably for a lot of people. But until you're put into a situation like this where, Oh god, I have to pick three songs from the entire catalog of the world. You don't really necessarily focus on that and see that those those linkages.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah, I hear you. And it's almost like being confronted with having to take three photographs, out of a Bankers Box full of photos that you've collected over those years and, and then you can spend like a day just looking at them and remembering things from the photos. I've gotten a lot of feedback that just the experience like you're describing just the experience of finding your three songs can be a real journey. I'm so delighted that you took me up on the offer for you to be on the show as the primary interviewee and I'm really looking forward to going through your list of songs and hearing why they're important to you. So let's jump into your list. The songs you chose were 'When the Coast is Clear" by Jimmy Buffett from 1986. "Sacred Book of Favorite Days" by Todd Sucherman from 2020. And "Back to You" by Steve Porcaro from 2016. I'm eager for us to listen to these songs together, and I'm interested in knowing why each of them is meaningful to you. So let's listen to your first song, "When the Coast is Clear" by Jimmy Buffett.

Aaron Gobler.:

Joanne I'll admit I only know a few Jimmy Buffett songs. And they're the most famous ones like "Margaritaville"; don't judge me. I'd never heard this particular tune before, but I really enjoyed it. And it also surprised me it had like this whole orchestration in the background. And I just imagined that all of Jimmy Buffett songs were like Margaritaville, but obviously they're not. So I want to thank you for including this in your list. I'm eager to know like what inspired you to choose this song?

Joanne Kaufmann:

I love Jimmy Buffett. Well, most people think the group we've seen the most is Toto it's actually that we've seen Jimmy Buffett more than any other artists that we've ever seen. What I love about this song is first up Jimmy Buffett, especially when you get into his deep cuts like this one. He's an amazing storyteller, and he paints very vivid images with the lyrics. We are beach people we grew up at the beach, especially my family. Kris is not quite so much, we grew up along the shores of Lake Erie. Being at the beach was always a very big part of my life with my family. But when we take vacations, unless we're going to Germany in March to see Toto we are typically at a beach, California, Florida, French Polynesia, Hawaii, Kaui, we're at beaches, and to me, when I am at the beach, for me, it really is like, I'm in that song. I am one with myself there, it's a place where I can kind of tune out the rest of the world, and just kind of reset on who Joanne is, when she's there. Knowing who I am, at that point in time, and really seeing myself very, very clearly, it's not when the beaches are busy, it's when we're just or maybe it's just me, when we were at the beach in April, there were times Kris was off doing other things. And I was down at the beach by myself, just walking, it doesn't have to be anything special just walking, it's not busy. Sometimes I've looked around at people and it's like, I kind of categorize people walking at the beach into the three types of people. And there are the people who are clueless and they're the people staring at their phones, while they're walking. And not really just being and taking in the environment where they are and not kind of letting go of 21st century technology to kind of find themselves. Then there are people like me are looking around and looking at looking inward and really just feeling who they are and being who they are. And then there are those people that I aspire to be and those are the people who are there, and you can just tell from their expressions, they know who they are. They know where they're going. And there's no question at all. And I think that, well, I normally fall into that middle group, I think a lot of people sort of go in and out between that questioning, seeking group in the middle and, and that confident group. And I just think it sort of comes down to where you are at that point, in that time, when you're at that beach. To me, it's just a place to kind of kind of find your center again. And that's what it really is, for me just hanging out, finding my center. And sort of like letting the ocean, letting the lake, even if I'm just walking in up to my ankles, sort of wash away all the ancillary noise of life that gets in the way of maybe some some clear thinking.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, I think everybody needs or everybody could really use some kind of quiet place or a special place, or contemplative space like you're describing. I grew up on the East Coast, only about 60 miles from Atlantic City and we visited Atlantic City a lot. So I was very used to being close proximity to the ocean. And then on the West Coast now is where I live. I'm very right here at the San Francisco Bay, there's something to be said about a large body of water, if it be a lake or something else that you can't see necessarily the other side. And this idea of your smallness, compared to this expanse of water. And like where one thing stops and one thing starts can be pretty intense. But I hear you also about like, if you're on a beach and this is just as busy as a city street, it doesn't necessarily have that same kind of feeling. I'm gathering that's what you're describing. And that there are some people who just walk around the beach with their phone or something in to them. It's just another thoroughfare but this song "When the Coast is Clear", I didn't really study the lyrics but is that kind of what Buffett is describing? Is that where he can find a quiet place?

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah, it's a place that he goes and he has a dialogue with himself with his "other me". He terms it, Hello Mr. other me. Kind of like that. What are you laughing about?

Kris Kaufmann:

Misheard song lyrics. For years I thought he was singing hello Mr. Weatherbee. All I could picture was the principal from the Archie Comics. But it's Mr. Other Me because just like the beach has two different vibes going in the tourist season and when the season is over, so to the people who are there.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah. And it's so he's having a dialogue with himself with his other self that self that usually you know that he's not quite in touch with as he's dealing with the business of daily life, you don't always have the time. And the ability to get in touch with that other you just because you're dealing with life.

Aaron Gobler:

So when you hear this song... I have a two part question, one is do you seek the song out when you're on the beach and/or when you were just sort of happen to hear this song are you immediately transported or are you kind of... has it kind of anchored you to this beach, and that you see the beach or you feel the beach, or you smell the beach when you hear this song?

Joanne Kaufmann:

No, I don't seek this out when I'm on the beach. Because the beach to me is, is the one place that is in music-free zone for me, I just I want to be there, I want to experience everything, the the sand, the surf the sounds of the birds, so I don't. However, when I hear this song, I am immediately transported to one two or three of my favorite beaches. And it's, it kind of, it's kind of a touchstone for me when I hear it, and it's like, oh, I remember that. And it's, I immediately relax.

Aaron Gobler:

I've been listening to a lot of audiobooks about hypnosis, and self-hypnosis, and just the use of the word trance that so much of our lives are in a trance when we're driving, and we get some place and we're like, I don't remember driving there. Or plenty of things in our life, we are actually in another state of consciousness, if that's the right word.

Kris Kaufmann:

Almost like being on auto-pilot.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes. And that just like a hypnotist can create certain anchors and say, you know, when I touch your shoulder, you'll fall asleep or whatever that song is a trigger, the song itself could trigger you to possibly smell the beach or imagine yourself there. So it really is a very powerful trigger or anchor, hearing a song. And as the more I learned about hypnosis, it makes things clearer for me as to how important music is as a trigger. And then I can apply that when I hear people describe like you're describing, you know how the song brings you back to the beach. So yeah, very, very powerful. Is there anything else you'd like to say about the song?

Joanne Kaufmann:

The whole album is very cool but I think this is the best song on it.

Aaron Gobler:

Great. Well, thank you again for including it. And I hadn't heard about this particular album. It's called "Floridays" D-A-Y-S.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah, he is really an excellent storyteller.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah. Very popular in concert, too. Joanne, your next song is "Sacred Book of Favorite Days" by Todd Sucherman. So let's give that a listen. And we'll talk about it

Aaron Gobler.:

Joanne, I've never heard of Todd Sucherman on the other side. before. I really enjoyed the song and I want to thank you for including it. You know, I learned that he started out professionally as a drummer. And he's performed with artists like Styx, Brian Wilson, Peter Cetera and even Spinal Tap. And I'll drop a few more names here. As I was listening to it just now I hear strong sounds of like, Matthew Sweet, The Byrds, Tom Petty, and then definitely a psychedelic, kind of like, undertone to it as well. But that's not even getting to the lyrics of the song, which I'm sure you're going to talk about. What inspired you to include the song on your list?

Joanne Kaufmann:

When I think about this, this song to me, it's all about Kris and I, but I think it kind of applies to anyone and any very positive relationship. Kris and I have known each other for 43 years. Been married for 33. We were babies when we met and, and toddlers when we got married. This song makes me think, we were talking about how music brings you back. And it's kind of like going through that banker's box of photographs. But when I look back at our lives, and the best days, the favorite days, it's the sacred book of favorite days. Our relationship. I mean, I look back and yeah, they're all the fabulous vacations we've taken, but they're also just walks in the park with our dogs. I think back to one Christmas in the early 80s where despite growing up in the frozen north, there was a Christmas when it was in the 70s and I remember Kris and I going out to walk and watch the sunset at the beach on that Christmas day. That's what "Sacred Book of Favorite Days" is for me, it's it's looking at that role at our relationship. And seeing that, yeah, virtually every fabulous day I've had, every favorite day I've had in the past 43 years, Kris has been a part of even if it wasn't something that he was directly involved with, maybe it was me getting a promotion at work. Yeah, he wasn't involved in that. But yeah, he was cheering me on as I was going for it. And he was celebrating with me when it happened. It's a very cool song to me. And I think it can apply to any relationship. I can look at my my best friend and say, you know, there's that day that we were snorkeling off of Bermuda that day. That's one of my favorite days in in our relationship there. So it's just a very cool song. And I like that you picked up on all of the influences. The psychedelic aspect sort of reminds me of early Beatles a bit.

Kris Kaufmann:

And the melodic, melodic structure that it takes reminds me of Squeeze.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay, okay.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Todd Sucherman is one of the most accomplished rock drummers. He took over and for Styx in the mid 90s, when their original drummer John Panozzo died. And this was his first time somebody convinced him that he could sing and this was his first time ever doing anything solo or really singing other than, like backup with Styx. It was him stepping out of his comfort zone into this new world. And it's I think he hit a home run with it because the album is very cool.

Kris Kaufmann:

And he's a nice guy.

Joanne Kaufmann:

He is. He is a super nice guy. I took a drum clinic and a masterclass with him earlier this year. And just as accomplished as he is, and as technically proficient, the man is a beast. He's just really very sweet and down-to-earth. And I know with the masterclass he had everyone get up and play 16 bars. And there was a young boy there, maybe eight years old, and he was real tiny, they had to really adjust the drum set for him because he was so tiny. This little boy and I are by far the least proficient drummers in this masterclass. Most of these people had been playing for decades. Some of them as professions, they were professional drummers. There were only 20 in the class, that's all he limited it to. Everybody's getting up there and doing this really just, really phenomenal 16 bars, and this little man got up there. And he just played time, and he didn't play it quickly. It was slow for 16 bars. And Todd made him feel so good. Because you would have thought that kid got up there and just blew the doors off the place. Yeah, it really just very down to earth. Very encouraging. Really a great guy.

Aaron Gobler:

A few thoughts enter my mind. One is, how

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah. And we have met some of those musicians anybody who's a star, especially people who we think are extremely talented, very gifted, we often think that they are superhuman or paranormal, something is different about them, right? And so I guess it is oddly rewarding when someone is really down-to-earth and a really nice person, because we imagine that they're not worldly, or they're too much in themselves or something. And yet, they're just a person. But yeah, but like you're describing with that thought with the child that there's a certain gift to being empathetic and supportive that not everybody has. in our times doing VIP, but he just really was just so incredibly down-to-earth and gracious. We were all just there absolutely in awe of him.

Aaron Gobler:

And how did you happen upon his work?

Joanne Kaufmann:

Well, I'd known him from Styx. I didn't find out about this, this CD though or this album until that master class and one day Kris came home from work and I work from home and he came in to the room and he goes, Do you know Todd Zuckerman is? and I'm like, Yeah, he's the drummer for Styx. Why? And he goes, He is having a masterclass in a clinic at N Stuff Music. And I was like, Whoa, sign me up. I got tickets that day. And it was at the clinic the day before the masterclass that he had his CD there. While he was there, you could buy it and I bought it just so I could have something signed while I was there. I started listening to and it's like this is you know, I bought it for one reason, but this is really, really good. And that's how I found Todd Sucherman outside of the drummer for Styx.

Aaron Gobler:

Right, right. Well, and just this particular song is really marvelous in how he packages the whole idea of... of all one's real favorite days having another person with them on all those pages.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yes. It's a it's a really cool album. And this song, I just absolutely have loved this song from the first time I heard it.

Aaron Gobler:

Well, thank you for your thoughts on that. And the last song on your list is "Back to You" by Steve Porcaro. So let's give that a listen.

Aaron Gobler.:

Joanna, I know you and Kris are huge fans of Toto and individual members of the band too. I understand you're quite attached to the album Someday Somehow by Steve Porcaro. Why did you choose to include the song on your list?

Joanne Kaufmann:

To me on two levels, it's all about coming back to Kris. Like I said, we met when we were babies, and we got married when we were toddlers. But there was 10 years between meeting and getting married. And it was it was kind of like an ebb and flow. We'd be together, we'd not be together, we'd be together, we'd not be together, we'd be together, we'd not be together. It was kind of like the waves coming and pushing us together again. And that was that was when we were younger. But I think about a time in my work that I traveled a lot for work. And this song reminds me of this time in my life. There was one trip where I started out in Orange County hopped on a plane after a video shoot in Orange County for a couple of days. Hopped on a plane, got off in San Francisco, did a video shoot in San Francisco for a couple of days, drove north to Ferndale, did a video shoot up there for a few days, drove back down to San Francisco did another video shoot there, went to Monterey did a video shoot there and, and finally came home and I was gone for about two weeks. And I could not wait to get home to Kris after that long away. And that's what the song reminds me of. That feeling I can picture myself. So sort of like an out of body experience. Almost I can picture myself sitting in SFO watching myself just waiting for my plane to get there. And that was an odd, it was an odd feeling for me because I absolutely love San Francisco. And even though my company would have preferred that I fly back on the red eye, whenever I was in San Francisco, I would always make sure I stayed overnight at least because I enjoyed the city so much. But after that two weeks away, and all the other trips I had before that I just couldn't wait to get back to Kris. And that's what this song, particularly, in particular brings me back to that trip after a series of trips and then this long one at the end. It brought me back to Kris.

Kris Kaufmann:

Yeah, that was a long time.

Joanne Kaufmann:

That was a very long time. And it rained a lot in Northern California on that trip. I had a beautiful, I had a I had a convertible for my rental car and never got to take the top down once.

Aaron Gobler:

Aw. Was there something poignant about the album in general, that you told me privately that you have a strong connection to the entire album?

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah. In 2016/17, my mother was diagnosed with lymphoma. She went through treatment and she went into remission. And remission lasted a very short time just maybe five or six months. And there was a recurrence. And she was going through different regimens and nothing was working. Although it hadn't been said, those around her, even as she was very optimistic, kind of realized that this is going to be terminal. And I was going home to my hometown, our hometown to visit her for a weekend and asked her what she wanted to do and it was a day in the fall and she said let's go out to Port Farms, I'd like to go there, get some pumpkins. And we went out to this little farm market and when I put her in my car, I had this album on. And mind you, my mother was hardcore country, and she rarely liked any of my music. The only thing we could agree on was Barry Manilow. So she got my car and "Someday/Somehow" was on and she said to me, she goes, is this that band that you and Kris always go see, meaning Toto. And I said, Well, it's one of the members of that band. But this is his solo work. And she goes, Oh, you know what, I really like this. And so we listened to it on our trek out to the farm a half an hour away. We listened to it on the way back, before and after dinner. But that day was just kind of a perfect day we got to the farm. It wasn't super busy. And we just did really goofy things. We did the corn maze, the adult corn maze, kicked our butts, we had to cheat and go out another way. But we were successful with the children's corn maze. Let me get that in there. We were successful with a corn maze for children under 12. And we picked out pumpkins and some mums and they had big yard giant yard games like Tic-Tac-Toe and stuff. We played some of that. And when she was tired, when she couldn't go on, we'd find a bench and we'd sit and we just watch families doing their family stuff, getting their pumpkins in the pumpkin patch. And then we went to dinner, and it was just kind of the perfect day. And now let's fast-forward a few months. It's morning, I'm driving into work. I got a call from a surgeon at a hospital in our hometown. And he told me that my mother had come in through the ER and he she had to go into emergency surgery. He told me what he found. And he said, quite honestly, with your mother's health right now, I don't think she's going to survive the surgery. What do I do if she crashes? And I said if she crashes during the surgery, don't resuscitate. I had her medical POA and her advanced directives and that was you know, I was carrying out her wishes. I wasn't playing God with someone else's life. So then he said, if she makes it through the surgery, she probably will not make it through the night. But if she does, what do we do? And I said, if she does, let's transfer her care from curative to palliative, and we're into hospice. My mother had two wishes for her death. One of her wishes was that she not have pain and that she died in her home when she was able to be discharged after the surgery. I took her home to her home. And I cared for her with the assistance of a hospice nurse and a hospice doctor. Everyone kept saying it will not be long. I mean, they were very surprised that in five days, she was even discharged from the hospital. Everybody kept saying today's probably the day. Well, today's probably the day went on for five days. And my mother was mostly unconscious for those five days. When she was awake, she was not very lucid. But instructions from the nurse, the hospice nurse and the hospice doctor and the palliative care doctor in the hospital were always, they can still hear you talk to them, play their favorite music. So over these five days, I had country music on 24/7. 24/7. I am not a huge country music fan after five days of the virtually no sleep because I had to get up and give her morphine every hour. So virtually no sleep and country music 24/7 I was like, okay, it was day five, and I couldn't take country music anymore. I said okay, I'm gonna change this. And I remembered that day, months earlier when she really enjoyed this music. So I thought okay, this is legit, I can put this on and it's not going to bother her. So I put it on. And I don't remember what song was playing. But I remember it was in the first half of the album. And that was when my mother... I want to say she chose to die. That's when she that's when she chose to die. That's actually when she died and I like to think that that album brought back that really perfect day and she knew it was okay to go. So that is why this album, other than all the great songs on it, but that's really why this album means so much to me.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah.

Joanne Kaufmann:

I want to believe that that music had some special connection for her because of that day.

Kris Kaufmann:

And I'll bet it did, because it was a shared page in your book of sacred days.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. Yeah. Wow. That's all very, very powerful. So I'm sure whenever you listen to the album, that that's something that's on your mind.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Absolutely.

Aaron Gobler:

So Joanne, is there anything else you'd like to share about your selections like things you may have thought of while we were listening to the songs or answers to questions that I didn't ask?

Joanne Kaufmann:

No, I don't think so. I just really encourage people to go out and find Steve Porcaro, find Todd Sucherman, listen to their very unique voices. They're not household names like Jimmy Buffett. But even for artists who are household names, who if it's Jimmy Buffett, and you know, "Cheeseburger in Paradise", "Margaritaville", if it's Toto, you know, "Africa" and "Rosanna", Styx "Renegade"...

Kris Kaufmann:

If you have a favorite group, look at the personnel listing on the albums of the songs and especially like, then Google those names of some of the players. And I think you'll discover that many of them have little side or solo projects you can discover that give you a whole new dimension on their musicality.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah. And even for the artists, the groups that you that, you know, but maybe haven't dug deeply into like Jimmy Buffett, everybody knows him. He's a household name. But most people don't get into the deeper cuts and don't know, you know, what a storyteller he really is, and how much feeling there is in many of his songs.

Kris Kaufmann:

And then variety of musical styles.

Joanne Kaufmann:

True. Yes.

Kris Kaufmann:

The ballads. Sure, there, we all know the party song, but his ballads and some of his more contemplative music.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Yeah, just just go out, explore, go outside of your comfort zone.

Aaron Gobler:

And I guess it's a case that a lot of artists in order to break through into pop radio at least 30, 40, 50 years ago to break into pop radio, you had to do a certain kind of formula. And so that is just by default, why we will all know "Rosanna or "Hold the Line" by Toto and especially for "Africa", because they're very, they're very easily consumable, but then never consider that those are the pop-ish songs, and they may be great pop songs. But some of their better work may actually be stuff that never actually made it on the radio. And you don't really know the full dimension of Jimmy Buffett's music if you just know him by those party songs,. Yeah, yeah. I want to thank you again, Joanne and Kris. Like last time, I had a lot of fun. I really look forward to today, just because we had a good time last time. And it sounds like you guys enjoyed yourself this time as well.

Joanne Kaufmann:

Oh, absolutely. Thank you for asking me to be a guest and allowing us to be here too.

Aaron Gobler:

And if you have any friends or colleagues, associates that you think would be great guests, then please send them my way,

Kris Kaufmann:

There are a couple people we have in mind.

Aaron Gobler:

Oh, awesome. And in that same vein, I'd like to say to my listeners if you want to be part of the show, start by going to our website, Aaron's Radio dot show, and clicking on the My Three Songs button on the homepage. You can also sign up for our mailing list so you'll know immediately when a new episode is available. You can also find Aaron's Radio Show on your favorite podcast service, but the podcast episodes only include interviews and no licensed music. So until next time, keep your ears and mind open and let more music into your world.

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