Aaron’s Radio Show

Episode 35

My Three Songs with Bari Siegel

 

Notes

Episode Notes

EPISODE 35 – My Three Songs with Bari Siegel:  Welcome, everyone, to Episode 35. This is the 25th in our series of episodes called My Three Songs where my guest chooses three memorable songs and we listen to the songs and talk about why they are meaningful to my guest. Bari Siegel is a good college friend. We listened to and discussed three songs she chose because they conjure poignant memories from her life.

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Three Songs

  1. Ships – Barry Manilow (1979)
  2. Humble and Kind – Tim McGraw (2016)
  3. Goodnight Saigon – Billy Joel (1982)

Aaron’s Radio Show has been licensed by ASCAP and BMI to include songs from their repertories in performances on this website.

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Transcript

This transcript was originally generated using artificial intelligence ("AI") software. It has been edited by a human being, but it may still contain some misspellings, lack necessary punctuation, or include other anomalies. We are regularly working to improve our transcripts!


Jake:

Coming to you almost live from Berkeley, California, it's Aaron's Radio Show ... the podcast ... with your host, Aaron Gobler.

Aaron Gobler:

Thanks, Jake. And welcome, everybody to Episode 35. Welcome to My Three Songs, where I play three special songs chosen by my guest, and we talk about why they chose each song. Today my very special guest is Barry Faye Siegel. I've known Bari since our days at Hofstra University on Long Island, which we both attended in the mid 1980s. She's a journalist, writing strategist and a self-described passionate wordsmith. Bari, thank you so much for being my guest today. It's great to catch up with you. What inspired you to be on the show?

Bari Siegel:

Well, first of all, I read about it when you were posting online. And it seemed really cool. I listened to a few of the episodes. And I was just really excited to catch up with you again. It's been a really long time.

Aaron Gobler:

Now, I know, Bari, you had had some online trivia games on Zoom back at the beginning of the pandemic. And that was a lot of fun. And I appreciate you putting that together. I got to meet a lot of your family that way.

Bari Siegel:

Yes, thanks. I'm, I'm a huge trivia buff. And the idea of being locked up and not being able to see friends was, you know, nuts for everybody. And I decided that I would start to collect trivia. And I signed up for a couple of daily emails where they would send me two or three trivia questions, and I started to compile them. And then a bunch of people had asked me to do it on a regular basis. So I would say for about four or five months, I was doing it every Saturday night. And it was fun. It was an hour of just fun. Nobody want anything other than just the the glory of knowing answers to crazy questions.

Aaron Gobler:

And I appreciate the amount of effort it takes to put something like that together. And certainly at the beginning of the pandemic, when it was just nice to have people together socializing in the best way we could. At the time.

Bari Siegel:

I agree with you, you know, one of the things that was fun about that is that I had been using Zoom prior to the pandemic, not a lot, but enough to be very familiar with it. And it was so funny that all of a sudden, it became the the mode of connection for the pandemic, but I was very used to it. So it was natural for me to put it on. And, you know, it was almost, in a way, like ... everybody has a glass of wine or, or a cup of coffee, and they were gathering and it was just it was fun. And I had a lot of weeks, maybe 50 or 60 people on so it was cool.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, it was it. I really enjoyed that. Thank you. Thank you again. So before we get officially started, can you tell me how music fits into your life? Like do you seek it out? Or is it usually in the foreground or the background?

Bari Siegel:

I think it's a funny way of asking that question. I would say it's absolutely in the background. When I compare myself to others, especially I've listened to a bunch of the other radio shows that you have done the episodes. And I noticed that different people come to music in different ways. I kind of call myself a one-hit wonder kind of fan but not really in the way we understand the term one-hit wonder. I guess I probably like a song or two from almost any group or person that's out there. Okay, but it's very possible that I couldn't tell you more than one or one or two of their songs with the exception of a very small handful. Your Billy Joels, your Elton Johns, your Carole Kings ... that I would say is my genre. But the reason why I suggested it's a background is because I'm not the kind of person that jumps in the car and immediately puts on music. I actually tend to listen to comedy on Sirius XM first, and then I might go toward "70s on 7" or "80s on 8", or news or that kind of thing. And more recently, I've gotten a little bit into country, but it's harder to listen to a country music station when maybe you like 10 songs, so 99% of the music that they play I've never heard before and I and I'm not really interested in ... so I did choose one country song which we'll talk about in a little while, for this. So it should be fun.

Aaron Gobler:

And when you say "70's on 7", I had another guest who use that same expression "70's on 7". So could you tell me is that? Is that a Sirius satellite channel? Is that what that is?

Bari Siegel:

Yes. So okay, Sirius XM, has "70s on 7", if you turn to channel seven, basically you have 24/7 of country music. And it's sort of cool because they actually have what year it is on the screen in the car. So if you're listening to it there, it's interesting to see where that song where you might remember it from or where it fit into your life at that point. Same thing with the 80s. There are a bunch of songs that when I hear them, I think of college, I think of our friends at school. And they have "90's on 9", they then move to something called "The Pulse". So my 24 year-old listens to music, she knows songs from the 70's. She obviously knows songs from the 80's and 90's. But she is definitely more of the 2000's. More more current. So I think some of us mid-50 year-olds mid, mid, maybe let's call it mid-to-Northern 50's, like "70s on 7".

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, I hadn't heard that expression until until I spoke to the other guests. And so I was just trying to figure out what that was. But thank you for that explanation. So besides saying Elton John, or Billy Joel, or some other artists where you maybe know a deeper catalogue of theirs, you're saying that, you know, a lot of songs, lots of individual songs, or maybe even a few songs from this artist, a few songs from that artist. Exactly. Do you create playlists for yourself based on those individual songs?

Bari Siegel:

I feel like somehow I missed the boat on playlists. I know that sounds kind of funny. Everybody I know has a playlist, my husband has an extensive playlist. The way I handle music is I go to YouTube, and then just play it in the car. So I tend to try to find, let's say I'm thinking about Kelly Clarkson. Let's just use that as an example. I'm thinking about Kelly Clarkson. And I think about a song that she sings. So we might put that into YouTube. And it will come out with a list of songs that people who like Kelly Clarkson would listen to. So the first one might be her. But the next one might be somebody that's similar to her. So that's how I hear some other music. But I don't actually have a playlist on my phone.

Aaron Gobler:

So it's more of an organic thing. So you're, you're saying I want to hear from Kelly Clarkson, you and you're going to this kind of like, artificial intelligence engine on YouTube, which is going to then figure out what's the what's something similar to this that you might like, and that's how you're finding some new music, but it's in a style that you've already identified that you like,

Bari Siegel:

Exactly. And I think that that sort of AI is, is at its accurately called AI when you're referring to Alexa, because sometimes I'll say to Alexa, Alexa, play Carole King's "Beautiful", and it will play that song. And then it will say, "Would you like to listen to this?" However, on YouTube, people have actually arranged huge groups of songs. So all I really need to do is pick one. And then it just keeps playing.

Aaron Gobler:

So it's more of a curated thing. So someone's actually ... that's kind of interesting, right? So it just makes it so much easier, and so much more accessible to you. Because someone else has done the work of associating these songs and figuring out which things are in the same mode or genre, let's say.

Bari Siegel:

I think that's true. And I also think that, depending on ... just the other day, I was walking in a store. And it was a couple of hours ... it was New Year's Eve, and a couple of hours before the store was ... before it was really like party time for New Year's Eve. The store was closing in a half-hour and the music was turned up pretty loud. And one of the things that I noticed is that everybody in the entire store was singing out loud to the music, even masked. So I can't, in this moment, remember what the song was. But it was really funny that I then went to my car and thought, you know, that reminds me of this song, and then I would listen to it. So that's how I do it.

Aaron Gobler:

It's really fascinating how every person has their own way of seeking out music and then finding the next thing they want to listen to. Producing the show has really introduced me to a wide range of guests that find their music, play the music, find the next thing they want to listen to, it's all it's all very different. Everybody has their own method. And it's always fun to hear different approaches. So I really I really like your approach.

Bari Siegel:

Thank you very much. I know that you are the interviewer here. But being me I can't help Ask a question.

Aaron Gobler:

Go for it.

Bari Siegel:

... and that is, I find that sometimes I hear a song, and it becomes an ear worm, and I get very stuck on that song or songs by that artist. I was curious if that happens to you?

Aaron Gobler:

Yes, there's certain songs that become ear worms, or have become ear worms and almost like just become part of my body. And that, in my mind, I'll be singing them and I'll replace lyrics with other words that rhyme or something in my brain ... so songs like "Toxic" sticks in my head all the time, "No Rain" by Blind Melon, for whatever reason. I mean, I don't ... I probably would have to talk to some musicologist to understand why some of these songs really just stuck in my head. I don't necessarily love them. Really. But yeah, it's pretty fascinating. Like, what does it does it match? Do these songs sync up with some kind of internal rhythm I have ? Or, or something I do know that, like, there have been studies done on the song "Toxic" and why it is incredibly catchy. And so I had read some of those analyses, but I'm always whistling something or singing songs in my head, and then realizing that they sound like other songs, and I do the mashups in my head and stuff.

Bari Siegel:

It's super cool. I've never done that, specifically, I'll kind of I'll hear a song in a commercial. There was a Queen song in a commercial several months ago. And I could ... it just kept playing over and over in my head to the point where I was, I was really getting annoyed with it, because I couldn't stop playing. I looked up how to get rid of an ear worm. And I did what what the article said, and it really did work. The advice is that you need to sing the song in your head, and get to the end and finish the song. Don't just keep playing a few lines in your head, get to the end of the song, so that your brain almost puts a period at the end interesting. And it has worked for me different songs fall into that category. Or I'll just play them over and over again until I get sick of it.

Aaron Gobler:

One really poignant story for me, I was cleaning out an apartment back when I was a young adult because I was moving out and I heard a Don Henley song in the car. And then I spent the next nine hours, you know, just getting everything else out of the apartment. But I had no radio, because I was, you know, getting the last things out of the apartment had nothing there to listen to. So for like nine hours, that's all I sang to myself. It was almost like torture. It was like I had nothing else that I ... it was it was really, it was frightening. But I don't even remember which song it was now, which is a good thing, probably. But yeah, I that's a very interesting approach that you know ... there's certain ways to stop getting having hiccups and other kinds of things. I never thought about either just burning your brain out on the song or like you said, giving it some kind of end in your brain or just you seeking something else can start so.

Bari Siegel:

Exactly. And so and something always finds its way into that space, but sometimes you just get so sick of it.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. Now right now my problem is I've been watching "X Files" so that theme song from the "X Files" is ... is before it was the theme song from "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" because I was watching a lot of that. So it's like whatever's in the fore of my brain. Yeah. So you chose three songs and I don't know if they're gonna become ear worms for me, but I'm really eager to jump right in and give a listen to them. The songs you chose were "Ships", by Barry Manilow, from 1979. "Humble and Kind", by Tim McGraw, from 2016. And "Good Night Saigon", by Billy Joel, from 1982. So the only song I really know from this list is the last one, "Good Night Saigon". But after listening to "Ships", I realized that I had heard that at some point, I'm eager for us to both listen to these songs together. And I'm interested in knowing why each of them is meaningful to you. So the first song on your list is "Ships" by Barry Manilow. Bari, Barry Manilow was a force of nature back in the 1970s when he produced his biggest hits. And I learned that this particular song was written by Ian hunter who was lead singer for the British band Mott the Hoople, who did the song "All the Young Dudes" and he also worked with David Bowie, and others ... It just seemed like quite a contrast to Barry Manilow. But what inspired you to include the song when your list?

Bari Siegel:

Well, first of all, I just let me correct you on one thing. If, if you're a Barry Manilow fan, then you understand the depth and breadth of his catalogue. And so the things that have been very popular like "Copacabana", or "I Write the Songs", that kind of thing, "Mandy", those are the the songs that obviously made him world famous ... people know those songs. But just like it is with any other musician, those are not necessarily the songs that are a real fan, a true fan, is going to listen to. So what I would say is that I've spent a lot of years kind of being the butt of jokes, of Barry Manilow jokes, because for whatever reason, being a "fannilow" is not a cool thing. As we discussed before, I don't have a list of songs on my phone when I had an iPod didn't have that. And I would also say that I'm not necessarily somebody who even would have had a lot of his songs. But I have gone to Barry Manilow concerts, probably I've been to 19 or 20 of them, and started going a very long time ago with a friend that I met in sixth grade. And we just bonded over it. And she and I just ... he's such a great performer. And we've had such a great time going to concerts over the years. So that even though he's not, Barry Manilow is not somebody that I listened to on a regular basis. There are a lot of songs that resonate. And the reason why I chose this specific song is because for me, one of the ways that I guess I decide that I like a song versus another song is whether or not the words stick with me. I remember them very quickly, because somehow they hold meaning for me. And this song holds particular meaning. My parents were divorced when I was eight. And there were not a lot of people who have whose parents were divorced at that point. And when this song came out, my parents had been divorced for a couple of years. And any song at that point that kind of spoke about separation, parenthood, that kind of thing. And there were several of them really hit me very hard. And so this is my song. And I know that everyone must have one or two of these. But if I feel like having a good cry, I'll put that song on in my car. And it brings tears to my eyes. I think that there's a couple of very, very poignant lines in the song. In the beginning, there's a line where he says, "I'm still here, it's just that we're out of sight". Yeah. And then, but later in the song, he, the father figure, says, "we only read you when you write," and it's kind of almost like Harry Chapin's "Cat's in the Cradle", right? The idea that, that the parent is ... the child is always looking for the parent's attention, and the parent is too busy. And then life changes a little bit. For me, this is a little bit different because my father moved away. And although I did have a relationship with him by phone, there certainly weren't cell phones back then. And I would see him maybe once a year. And so this song connected me with other people made me feel like, hey, if somebody wrote a song about this, I'm not the only one that feels this way.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, that's a very powerful nature of stories and songs, or stories in songs that some songs connect really, intrinsically or just very deeply. And I think just, I mean, this is part of comedy, too, is when somebody else is describing something that you've experienced, and you don't think others have experienced it. And there's some kind of communal thing that happens in that case, where you can laugh at it, or in this case, cry about it. Because you're realizing that somebody has put to words, something that you've been feeling for for some time.

Bari Siegel:

I think that that's very true. And I also think that there's, you talk about a force of nature, I think that there's also a force of nature, in the musical world in that I don't know if you've ever experienced this, but there are times when for no reason, a song will come to mind. And then I will get in the car, and I'll turn on music, and that song will play. And it hadn't heard it in a long time. And it just, it's it's almost like, you know, we're bound ... music binds us, even though I'm not somebody who would say that music is very central to their lifestyle. I do have many songs that I would consider to be part of the soundtrack of my life.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, we often use that expression soundtrack of my life in this kind of general sense. But in some ways, you could probably sit down and plot out in a timeline of your life and then associate songs to the different parts. So it really is in that definition. You know, really is a soundtrack to your life.

Bari Siegel:

What you just said is so true, because ... what I just thought of as you were making that comment is that when my daughter was born 24 years ago, I just like any other new mom sitting in the rocking chair, feeding her at two o'clock in the morning, and we had a small radio in the room, and it was set to kind of an easy listening, maybe pop station. And the theme song from "Titanic" was number one at the time. 24 years ago this week. So whenever I hear "My Heart Will Go On", immediately takes me right back to that rocking chair right back to the middle of the night. I can hear that ... there's like a Mike & the Mechanics song ... that ... it was almost as though at two o'clock in the morning, that radio station just had a number of songs that they played one after the other. I guess they figured not many people were listening at that hour. That was just a mini soundtrack. So even though I happen to like "My Heart Will Go On", I don't ever choose to listen to it. I think I've heard it enough times.

Aaron Gobler:

I believe this. And a lot of guests have said this as well, that music, or a particular song can really transport you ... transform your current mindset or feeling or comfort level or something, but also really transport you back to some other place. I had a guest who said that when she hears "Brown Eyed Girl", she can experience the smells of where she was when she heard that song. And I also mentioned to another guest that ... so I feel like it's almost like some hypnotic transportation. Sometimes when you hear a particular song, that whatever you're doing at that moment, your brain gets triggered or switched, almost like someone snapped their fingers or touched your shoulder or something. And then suddenly, you're in that space.

Bari Siegel:

Yeah.

Aaron Gobler:

Let's move on to your second song, which is "Humble and Kind", by Tim McGraw. Let's give that a listen. And we'll talk about it on the other side. Bari, this may be the first country song I played on the show. I really want to thank you for including this tune on your list. It's really, really a beautiful song ... very understated. And it has a great message ... one that I think it would be better world if we all follow this thought process. And this message, really, from the song. So what inspired you to include this song on your list?

Bari Siegel:

I guess there's a few things. I have a son who's 19 years-old. And he and I bond over music an awful lot. And like many other teenagers, he likes a lot of the kind of music that our parents probably didn't like when we played it at his age. And so I think we try to find a balance. He's not really interested in "70's on 7"; Barry Manilow does not light up his boy. But we found that in meaningful country songs, that there's something to talk about to try to figure out what the what the singer is really saying. And in this song, I thought about a variety of songs that I could choose for, to plug in here. And I chose this one because I think that there's a handful of messages that are really important. One of the most important lines comes for me at the very end, in the very last verse. "When you get where you're going ... don't forget to turn back around and help the next one in line." And I think that that message of Pay It Forward is a thing that every parent needs to not only breathe life into, but make sure that that's something that their children know. There's a lot of things that we hope we can get through to our children. And I think that that's a very, very important one. There's another part of the song where he says "when you've achieved what what you've been working for, take the time to feel pride about it, but stay humble and kind" at the same time. So I find it to be not preachy, where some country songs are preachy. The other part that when I listened to what I kind of certain things come out for me in this time that we were just listening to it. One of the things that really stood out is "I love you ain't no pickup line, always stay humble and kind" that I think that that's really important that the line before that is "know the difference between sleeping with someone and sleeping with someone you love." And I think the song is probably written for a generation of people who maybe don't understand that as much and I think it's pretty powerful to have to have that put out there. So I know I like a few McGraw songs and not a lot I'd probably there's probably, like hundreds of them that I couldn't even tell you what they were called. But there's a few. And that falls into that category of just liking a few that one person sings.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, I don't think I know any other songs by Tim McGraw. But I certainly know of him. As you are reiterating some of the lyrics from the song, I definitely picked up those lyrics too. And it's made me wonder if this song could be written in any other kind of genre. It seems like the country music style seemed perfectly suited for his song. And I agree, it's, it's almost like a little lesson book or a little guide, a little field guide there to ways that you can be humble and kind that maybe younger generations have not really been, you know, learned that through other experiences in their lives.

Bari Siegel:

I think that's very, very true. And I don't know if you don't know what it's called, but they're thin pieces of wood, and they have sayings on them. And people kind of like ... I have one in my dining room that says No Stress Zone ... doesn't work very well. I'm not suggesting it works really well. I'm just saying that, that I see them in different places. And I brought my son, one that says "Always stay humble and kind". And funny enough, and this is the bad part of the story. This is the good and the bad part. On one hand, he nailed it to his ceiling. So when he opens it opens his eyes in the morning, it's the first thing he sees. And on the bad side, he nailed it to the ceiling. So it is there's two things there Right. Like it he wanted it to be a message that he woke up to Hmm. But at the same time, he, you know, kind of decided to vandalize the house so I you know what, whatever. But it is like a funny funny kind of thing. But when ever I hear a country song, I think that there's there's two sides of the of the coin on country. Right? There's ... my brother introduced me to some country music a number of years ago. Oh, and it was so odd. He lives in Atlanta, and I guess, technically the South, and he had been listening to some country music. And when he told me, I thought to myself, it just seems incredible that he would be listening to that. And he played a couple of songs for me. And they weren't that twangy kind of, I guess what we... somebody in our generation might consider to be country like, "All My Exes Live in Texas", or whatever, you know, those songs are, but more modern day country music has absolutely a message to it. And it's not kind of that twangy thing. And so I would definitely... I'd be happy to share some other ones that I feel like you would have the same kind of aha, that's a that's a really cool message type of thing.

Aaron Gobler:

Well, Carrie Underwood, had that song called "Before He Cheats". It's got a wonderful, it's just, it's just a wonderful song. All the visuals that it creates in your mind. Yeah, just so I hear you on that. I don't seek out country music. You know, this is an example where I just love this song. It says lots of good things for country songs.

Bari Siegel:

I'm really glad that I got to share it with you.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes, thank you. And the last song on your list is by someone I know very well, Billy Joel. And this song is "Good Night Saigon". Bari, that is really an intense song. The lyrics are so powerful and just all the sparseness of the music beyond the piano. Just the negative space of that song is very powerful. It came out during our college years, I remember Billy Joel songs as being part of the larger soundtrack of our time at Hofstra. And that probably that's partly due to the fact that Billy Joel grew up on Long Island. Why did you choose to include this song?

Bari Siegel:

Well, even now, I sort of have goosebumps every time from the first time I heard that song to just the second I always I get the chills when I hear it. I've seen Billy Joel in concert a few times. And one time, I actually saw where he had arranged for a group of Vets to come up on stage. And when he gets to the part where you know, they stood arm in arm. And the it was so powerful to like ... he let the vets do the singing of that part. And I'll never forget that it's one of those things that just stays with you. I think that Billy Joel in general, brought very interesting parts of Americana to life. Many of his songs deal with very, very specific points. And they have a very specific message. And the message here is, is undeniable and anybody who listens to it and doesn't get moved in some way ... that would be kind of sad, that if you listened to that song and didn't get moved, because it's it is powerful, the words are powerful. I never thought about the negative space. But I think you're right about that also. And I think the, the helicopter, those sounds, you know, in the beginning, you have no idea what that is, when when you first hear the song. And then when, when the outro kind of is that again. It's it's also even more powerful. So yeah, there's just so many Billy Joel songs that I love. But that one is one of my favorites.

Aaron Gobler:

With this radio show. I'm sitting here in a very quiet room with my earpiece on listening to the song very closely, almost like staring at a piece of art, without any other distraction. And so I'm getting some deeper understanding or deeper appreciation for some songs that I just kind of listen to, nonchalantly to put it one way. And I picked up things like besides the helicopter sound, the bridge sounds kind of like a dirge the way that's done, and that there's just a slight percussion beyond the piano. And I guess some people might say, that's kind of like one of these little egg-shaped shakers that make this a little kind of sound. Yeah. And it's in a rhythm almost like a clock. And I don't know if that was purposeful or not, but it to me, it seemed like, you know, just counting down time, there was a reference to how one night could seem like six weeks. So this, this kind of like, subtle intensity, that, you know, that sound still going on through most of the song. Yeah, I told us like, I'm picturing some of these pieces of art you'd see in a museum, that's done with just tiny little dots of paint. And you can stare at it. And I think maybe even in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" when they're at the Chicago Institute of Art, and one of them is looking at the artwork, and they there, the camera just keeps zooming in and zooming in and zooming in on on one couple dots or something. But it's like, I just staring at the song for a long time. And you can pick out all these different parts of it. And it really is just a very, very beautiful song and you're right about Billy Joel as a storyteller in "Allentown", "Downeaster Alexa" and some other songs where it's really a whole story woven into the song and he's making certain points about people's lifestyles or how the country has done or not done for certain people. There's a lot of moral stuff woven into into a lot of that.

Bari Siegel:

Agreed. And I think, you know, "We Didn't Start the Fire", which is not one of my favorite Billy Joel songs. But that's the ultimate in that right is where we get so sick of everything. And Billy Joel's own personal story. You know, he's so famous and wealthy and he's had so much good fortune has so much talent, but he's also his own personal story is rather sad. And so the fact that he turned a lot of that toward his music, for me is very powerful. And I wanted to mention that, you know, I had always known the line "one night seemed like six weeks", and that they repeat Parris Island, but this time, just like you, I zeroed in on that and thought about what that meant for if you could imagine just, you know, sitting, you know, being in a foxhole, not knowing when the next explosion was going to happen, and just seeming like it was forever. And that's very powerful. It's like a lot of songs so you can listen to any one of them and put yourself in, you know, wherever he is. I mean, even "Piano Man" is so commercially successful. But I happen to love whenever I get the chance to go to a piano bar or dueling pianos are that kind of thing. And the piano player always hates playing "Piano Man". They mean they almost say I'm gonna play it first so that nobody asks me to do this. It's true, but the ... that and "Sweet Caroline" right? But the fact is, is that if you allow yourself to listen to some of these songs that have become kind of bubblegummy you you know exactly where you can put yourself in that moment of being in that bar. And I guess you know, we've said this a few times, but Billy Joel, I can place you know where things have happened in my life to various Billy Joel songs.

Aaron Gobler:

Bari, is there is there anything else you'd like to share about your selections like something you may have thought of while you were listening to one of the songs or something we haven't covered?

Bari Siegel:

Well, I wanted to thank you for having me and for inviting me to do this. It's It's been really fun. It's been great catching up with you. And also, I don't think that I've ever taken the opportunity to really think about why I like the songs that I do. And I think that after listening to a bunch of the interviews that you've done through this radio show, that it's taught me to maybe if a song resonates with me, if I hear a song, and it really resonates, maybe taking that time to listen to it a little bit more closely, and, and so I've learned a little about myself and the way I interact with music. So I wanted to thank you, not only for having me on the show, but for giving me that little piece of self awareness.

Aaron Gobler:

Awesome. I'm delighted that that that you had such a takeaway from the experience. I've had people tell me that it's been very difficult in some cases to come up with their song some people said, like, right away, they knew what their songs would be. It's just like three little windows into your, into your life. And I certainly appreciate everybody who's who's come on the show and shared that. Whether it's been a nice revisiting or an exploration and discovery. I do. Thank you again, for your time today and for your list. Absolutely.

Bari Siegel:

I would just also say that anybody who's listening who's thinking about wanting to participate, do it for two reasons. First of all, catching up with Aaron is great. And second, because it really has been an eye-opening experience. Sometimes we listen to our favorite songs, and and just know that we love them. We don't think about them as much and this gave me an opportunity to really think.

Aaron Gobler:

Thank you for that promotion. And thank you again, Bari. And I want to say to my listeners if you want to be part of the show, because Bari is imploring that you consider this ... and me too ... start by going to our website, Aaron's Radio dot show, and clicking on the My Three Songs button on the homepage, and you can also sign up for our mailing list, so you'll know immediately when a new episode is available. You can also find Aaron's Radio Show on your favorite podcast service, but the podcast episodes only include interviews and no licensed music. Until next time, keep your ears and mind open and let more music into your world.

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