Aaron’s Radio Show

Episode 43

My Three Songs with Jacob Hanson

 

Notes

Episode Notes

EPISODE 43 – My Three Songs with Jacob Hanson  Welcome, everyone, to Episode 43. This is the 33rd in our series of episodes called My Three Songs where my guest chooses three memorable songs and we listen to the songs and talk about why they are meaningful to my guest. Jacob Hanson is a personal trainer in the San Francisco Bay Area. We listened to and discussed three different types of Reggae songs that are some of Jacob’s favorites.

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Three Songs

  1. Love is My Religion – Ziggy Marley (2006)
  2. Good Vibes – Rebelution (2012)
  3. Peace, Love & Harmony – Culture (1988)

Aaron’s Radio Show has been licensed by ASCAP and BMI to include songs from their repertories in performances on this website.

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Transcript

This transcript was originally generated using artificial intelligence ("AI") software. It has been edited by a human being, but it may still contain some misspellings, lack necessary punctuation, or include other anomalies. We are regularly working to improve our transcripts!


Jake:

Coming to you almost live from Berkeley, California. It's Aaron's Radio Show, with your host, Aaron Gobler.

Aaron Gobler:

Thanks, Jake, and welcome, everybody to Episode 43. Welcome to My Three Songs, where I play three special songs chosen by my guests, and we talk about why they chose each song. Today, my guest is Jacob Hanson. Jacob is a star athlete and personal trainer in the San Francisco Bay area. One thing I'm certain you don't know about him is that he taught me how to jump rope at the ripe age of 54 ... How are you today, Jacob? And can you tell our listeners about your past track achievements, and like what you're doing nowadays?

Jacob Hanson:

Hi, Aaron, thank you for having me on the show. I'm very excited. I'm doing well today. Things are great. And I'm really looking forward to this interview. My past track achievements ... I went to UC Berkeley, and I ran the 400 hurdles. And I became an All American at UC Berkeley. And yeah, I ran fast ran over hurdles did some long-jumping, all the sprinting events, and then ended my career with track and field and became a personal trainer. And so now I work with clients all around the East Bay. I teach them everything that I know about track warmups and exercise and fitness and lifestyle, and even jumping rope.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes. And, and this jumping rope activity ... this is you know, pre pandemic when I was actually ... we were actually physically in a gym at the time. And you were very big on teaching me how to do hurdle type motions, and you thought maybe I can possibly enter some kind of competition. Is that right? Definitely.

Jacob Hanson:

I think at any age, you can still run, you can still enter a competition, you can still compete. But yeah, hurdle drills go much beyond just being on the track, it's a lot of mobility; opens up your hips, it's really important for everyone to do that. And it's just a fun way, you know, thinking of that barrier, that hurdle? Most people is it's a very complex, scary. And so you know, introducing that to you and showing you and other clients that, you know, it's just a little thing that you go around. It's not too it's not too challenging.

Aaron Gobler:

And I never thought that I would actually be able to jump rope. I felt that trying to jump rope just solidified or cemented for me my lack of certain coordination. And once I actually was able to do it i i felt like a completely different person.

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah. It's, it's something that you think is so simple. You know, riding a bike, jumping rope, things that you do as a kid, you don't really think about it. But when you have to relearn those things, you find out that there's much more involved. And something that seems so simple, can actually be very difficult to achieve. But once you do, I mean, yeah, it's amazing. I think we got can we get to something like 50 Jump ropes? Yeah. Yeah, it's crazy. We went from ... yeah, barely getting one to go into 50. And, yeah, that's that that feeling is amazing.

Aaron Gobler:

And I'm going to assume just like, you know, riding a bicycle, I had never really jumped rope before. So if I, I know, if I get on a bicycle and haven't ridden the bicycle for like, 20 years, I would be able to figure it out pretty fast. I'm guessing and hoping that if I were to pick up jump rope again, after these two years that enough of it would come back to me quickly enough. But I haven't tried that yet.

Jacob Hanson:

I think we should. Yeah. Let's do it. Let's jump.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. Okay, maybe we can have some kind of jump rope session where we're both in person and you can encourage me to, to jump rope again. And have my glory days back.

Jacob Hanson:

I'm for it; with a little reggae.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah. With reggae music. So Jacob, I'm really happy you decided to be on the show. I'm really kind of thrilled actually. And I know you and I have had a lot of opportunity in the past to talk about music, but I still remain curious about your music tastes. And so I'm psyched to do more of a deep dive on your music tastes. But what inspired you to be on the show?

Jacob Hanson:

Well, I've listened to the show. I really like the idea. I like the idea of my three songs you you share. And you'll find through the songs that I chose that you can see that that's part of the theme too is sharing your experience with other people, sharing your culture with other people, sharing what you love with other people. And you're doing that here. And, you know, through this show, you can connect with people, you may have never, you walked past them on the street, never talked to them, you may have thought you had never nothing in common with them. And then you listen to the music and you realize that, you know, this is where we're much more similar than we thought, or you connect to that person in a way that you would have never connected. So I think the show is awesome. And I'm excited to share some of the music ... that I spent a long time since since you started ... I've been thinking, what would I do if I was on this show? What songs and then I go through all my music? And I find okay, what songs would I share? Because you could only choose three, that's a difficult task, right? So I'm banking on ... that I'll be back on the show. And I can share three more, three more, and we'll get deeper and deeper. And I'll be able to expand to different types of music, also.

Aaron Gobler:

I really believe that music tastes, are things sometimes people hold very close to their chest. They don't want to show or talk a lot about what they like about music, what music they like, for fear that somebody else might judge them on their taste, or maybe wonder why they like that particular kind of music. And then there's something really rewarding about you hearing somebody else talk about music and realizing you're really connecting with them or that they love the same things that you do. And you don't ... you feel that connection, like you were describing. My guests have generally been people who are very passionate about music, and so they could speak hours about music; and the listeners, a lot of them really can appreciate that passion and really get and really vibe with that. So Jacob, before we get started with your song lists, can you tell me like how music fits into your life? Like do you seek it out? Is it usually in the foreground or the background of each day?

Jacob Hanson:

Music for me, it wasn't something that I sought out at a young age. And we've had conversations before where you'll you'll tell me about music and I'm completely lost. I don't know the artists, I don't know the history. I don't know who they are. I may have heard the song before. But I think the way that music came to me, it wasn't about those things. And I didn't seek them out. As a as a kid, I would hear beats and I would hear the rhythm and I would hear the sounds. And I didn't really focus on lyrics much as through my history of music. It's interesting because I chose songs specifically about their lyrics in these three in this in this choice here. But I also tried to find a blend of still having what is kind of most important to me, which is the music in the background and, and being able to feel and kind of vibe with the music. I also ... so I'm in my mid 30s and I don't really listen to the same music that people in around me listen to so I'm kind of the oddball when it comes to music I listen to ... like this is a lot of older reggae from 60s 70s 80s I don't listen a lot to the music of today. I listen to music that is in foreign languages that I don't even know what they're saying. And there was a couple of really good songs that I liked there. And I got a little nervous because if I put those in ... like three, I thought, well, what if they're actually saying something really bad? I did not know. I'm sitting here jammin' into it. And all of a sudden, it's like, Wait a minute. So yeah, I always found that it was hard to connect with other people my age when it comes to music because I don't really listen to what most people listen to. So, um, you know, being able to share that a little bit kind of and show why it's important to me, I think it's gonna be exciting here. Music today; music is pretty much in everything that I'm doing, but it's usually in the background. So with personal training, I'm working with different clients throughout the day. And I've found that music really helps with our sessions. And so I like to have music in the background. And that's where finding music with good beats is kind of important because you can't you're focusing on exercising, I'm focusing on coaching or training and you can't focus on the lyrics per se, but you can hear the beat, and the beat can motivate you or the beat can can completely change the mood of what's going on. And so I really try to connect with each client. And I try to find what that client likes or what that client may need through the music. And I try to put that on and create an atmosphere that really makes them feel welcome and positive and happy. And you know, excited to work out. More excited to be in this experience with me for that given amount of time. And so the music is on all day long. And I'm slowly learning a little bit more because of that ... I'm learning. Clients will ask, well, who's the artist and this song because I really like the song. And so I'll have to look up and see who is actually playing. But yeah, it's my Spotify, if you look at what my top songs are of the year, it's all over the place, because it's songs that I've played with clients, and not necessarily my music. But yeah, I just have this huge collection now of very specific for certain clients or for certain moods. And so I just kind of go through all that from time to time.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, it certainly underscores how influential or instrumental music is to body movement, I used to do some disc jockey work and was very conscious of the beats per minute, and, and how that impacted people and how it matched their heart rates, or how it could cause them to increase their heart rate and the pace of their dancing and movement and such. So, so much of a connection between the tempo, and rhythm of music and, and physical movement, there's definitely that connection, like you're describing.

Jacob Hanson:

One of the earliest memories that I have about music is and how it connects with you. We didn't listen to a lot of music at home, in the car it'd be talk shows or other things like that. And whenever I would be, whenever I get in a bad mood, whether it was in, you know, an argument with my parents or a disagreement or upset about rules that they ... whatever it would be, if I was in a bad mood, my dad had this strategy. And he would turn on blues music, and then leave. And I would be they're upset that I have to do the dishes or mad that my whole life is ruined, because I had to do this chore. And you're listening to this song about a person who lost his job, he lost his wife, he's got no money, he's getting kicked out of his house. And you're sitting there like, I'm mad about the dishes. And this poor guy lost everything. And he come back 45 minutes later, you can't be mad and you can't be upset. And that was a strategy that worked. And it still works today, when when I turn on blues music, if I'm sad or something and you hear that, it's like, you know, this little problem that I have is really not, it's not worth the mood that I'm in, it's not worth, you know, what I'm putting myself through or putting everyone else through. Like, there's bigger problems out there. This is just a little a little thing. And so that was one of the first things I remember about how music can change your mood and how you feel. And it can take you out from something that's you know, took you so low, it can take you right out of that very quickly.

Aaron Gobler:

I really enjoyed that story because it shows how hearing a narrative through a song can shift your your attitude very quickly. Definitely. So before we jump into your list of songs, because we were talking about personal trainers and personal training and such, I do want to make a shout out to one of my earlier guests, Mamie, who actually met through these Zoom classes that you were doing when the pandemic began. And so shout-out to Mamie, you know, I did a shout-out to you, Jacob during her show. So I'm making a shout-out to her on yours.

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, yeah, you did. I believe you guys. At that point. You were asking for me to get on the show. I did. I was like, Yo, like you guys were like we're excited for for my show, too. Yeah. Jacob, Ziggy Marley's dad was Bob Marley, who is considered

Aaron Gobler:

So it took 30 episodes! But here you are, or something like that, right? So it was worth it was worth the wait. And we know that made me was very, very excited when she heard you were gonna be on the show. We're just gonna do our best to to really impress, maybe, and maybe encourage her to come back on again. So, so let's jump into your list Jacob. That's why we're here. The songs you chose were "Love Is My Religion", by Ziggy Marley from 2006; "Good Vibes" by Rebelution, from 2012; and "Peace, Love and Harmony" by Culture from 1988. All these songs were new to me, and they're all reggae tunes. The only reggae I've had on the show so far was a song by The Police. So I'm eager to for us both to listen to these songs and I'm interested in knowing, why each of them is meaningful to you. So let's jump in with the first song which is "Love Is My Religion" by Ziggy Marley. one of the pioneers of reggae, and I know a few Bob Marley songs. But until this week, I don't think I'd heard any Ziggy Marley songs. What inspired you to include this song on your list?

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, this song from Ziggy Marley, it has a very clear message, I think. And I think that it's very straightforward, about love, and taking love as a religion as a belief as a way of life. And applying that, to me just applying that to how you live. And I think it's a very simple way to live life, if you live with love. If you love the planet, you're going to treat the planet well, if you love the trees, you're going to treat the trees well. If you love a person, you're going to treat them well. You don't treat somebody bad that you love. So it's just a motto and a message to, to remember. And I listened to it periodically. Just to remind myself that, you know, if you do everything with love, you're not going to go wrong.

Aaron Gobler:

It's interesting that his lyrics, he says, "Loves is my religion / you can take it or leave it / you don't have to believe it" ... in that, like he's saying, Love is MY religion. This is how I operate. And you know, it's up to you what you want to do. But he's he's kind of exclaiming this that this is the way he wants to be. Is that do you get that same feeling?

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, I get that feeling. And I think also when you when you talk about religions, a lot of religions are pushed on people. So I think it's, I think this line is, you know, this is the way I want to live my life. And you can live this way too, you can see what it means and why it's beneficial and how it's good. If you don't want that, that's fine. You can live your life how you want to, and I'll respect that too. But I think the message of pushing things on people is not always the right strategy. It's not the best way for everyone.

Aaron Gobler:

And that religion we often associate that with, with what you hold as a core beliefs and, and how you live in some kind of spiritual way. And so by him stating that love is his religion ... right ... that's kind of enforcing or reinforcing this idea that that's where his core and his spirit and his how he lives his life is based on love.

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. And so when it comes to reggae, I kind of have ... these three songs are in my collection that I have in my folder is called my Bible. And I think with reggae, there's so many different types of reggae, and it started from Roots reggae, which was Bob Marley, and I couldn't get Bob Marley in on this list. And so I feel a little bit better that I have his son. So there is some Bob Marley on this list, because that's kind of where it did start a little bit with Bob Marley for me and with reggae. And is expanded. As I learned more about reggae and the different types of reggae, it's expanded, all across the board. And so I do have this collection of kind of lyrics that I think you can you can take a lot of reggae lyrics, and you could turn that into a Bible on a way a way to live your life on a way to treat others on it I think that there's enough there that I could just take these poems and and live my life based off of these poems and be a good person and so this is one of those top songs that really just shows what that means.

Aaron Gobler:

The original Roots reggae ... is that ... I mean I'm now thinking of the song by Bob Marley ... that song "One Love", which is probably one of the more famous songs ... "Let's get together and feel all right", you know it's all love-based. Is that what you say that the Roots reggae ... is that really the core? This idea of love and peace; is that what you would say would be the main core of that?

Jacob Hanson:

It's part of it. So Roots reggae is it's a branch of reggae was the original rake. Okay, that started and Bob Marley was one of the originators of that style of music. Culture came a little ... so, Culture is going to be the third song ... but they came a little bit later but they're also part of that Roots reggae and you can kind of you'll hear the different styles today in these music. So this song came out in 2006. So it's more of the newer version of reggae. This is the next generation of how reggae evolved. But Roots reggae was the beginning and it kind of it started with ... the lyrics were talking about love, they're talking about the suffering that's happening. They're talking about pride. They're talking about, you know, corrupt governments and racial oppression, all of these things are coming out of Roots reggae, because those are the messages they wanted people to hear, like we're suffering, we just want to have equal rights, we just want to like, be able to sit and love our neighbor and have no problems. And so a lot of the lyrics from Roots reggae is just about those basic principles of being an equal human being. And the crazy thing is that from the 60s when they started that those are the same exact things that are still being asked of today. And so I can connect to it on the on the Roots reggae level, I can connect to what Bob Marley was asking and what the what Culture was asking. During that time, our generation of human beings are still asking for those same things. So the connection is pretty deep for me as it feels, you know, 60 years ago, but it feels like these songs are that coming out today? Like this is music of today.

Aaron Gobler:

And the Roots reggae ... that didn't start in the United States that started elsewhere?

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, it came from Jamaica. Yes. Yeah. They came from Jamaica. And it involved a lot of Jamaicans went to Europe went to the UK. And so when you look at reggae, and you talk about there's the Roots reggae, there's Dancehall, there's Lover's Rock, there's all different styles ... West Coast, which is what we're going to get into next with Rebelution.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah. There's a type called Reggaeton. Is that a me saying that correctly?

Jacob Hanson:

Yes. That's, another type more of a newer version of reggae. Yes.

Aaron Gobler:

And when I'm looking up a song on Wikipedia, sometimes a new song that I've heard and it describes it as Reggaeton. And so that's a spin-off per se? A variety of ...

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, so reggae, Reggaeton, and Dancehall is another one. Soca Music is now kind of how reggae has evolved into that's the music that you'll find in the club. That's the music you you dance to when you go to like the parades, the carnivals, that's the music they're gonna play ... not so much Dancehall ... And so that's the evolution of today. But in general, with reggae, it's multicultural, you have African reggae, you now have, you know, the UK reggae, you have Hawaiian reggae, it's all over. And it's all slightly different. But it's all the same messaging.

Aaron Gobler:

Mm hmm. That's a good segue into the next song, which you started talking about by Rebelution, which, as you said, is more of a West Coast reggae; and I really enjoy the song and I'm eager for us to listen to it together. So that's listen to "Good Vibes" by Rebelution; and we'll talk about it on the other side. Jacob, as I said earlier, I really liked the song. It sounds so uplifting and it's messages very positive. And what inspired you to include the song on your list?

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, I think those two things are exactly you hit on the head. Plus, by now ... I should have said earlier ... if you're not snapping your fingers or bobbing your head or just like moving to a ... if it doesn't move, you gotta let it move you. So I'm hoping that you were there, you know, bobbing your head or something? Because I, I had to put myself on mute. I was singing I'm dancing in the chair a little bit. But yeah, I think this song kind of encompasses the music side of ... you can dance to it, you can groove to a you can, you know, you really feel the music part. But then also when you listen to the lyrics, yeah. Wow. Every like, you can stop and read every line of the lyrics and be like, yes, yes. Like this applies to us today. Yeah, yeah. And so I think just, again, these kind of like, as my Bible kind of songs, you go back to him just to reinforce things and remember, and, you know, don't forget that this is important.

Aaron Gobler:

I mentioned, like, you know, has this uplifting message. But it's interesting, it's countered with this whole idea of like, hatred and tension and racism and all these things that are, are ... and like you're saying, are still around, and you know, with social media, just almost like ratcheted up. And, but then the flip of that is like, they're bringing only good vibes, right? So it's not like just be happy and you know, don't worry, be happy, but more like, there is a lot of this darkness and bad stuff. But we should be concentrating on good vibes.

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, I think concentrated A lot of good vibers, but also, yeah, they're, they're pointing out all these, these things that are either happening to people, or, you know, the racism that's going on. And we need to change that. We need to make a change, and we need to live our lives differently. The racism is killing us, it is literally killing some of us.

Aaron Gobler:

Yes.

Jacob Hanson:

And that, you know, to point that out in a song that this is like one of their most popular songs, and it gets played at every concert, and it gets listened to so many times. So just that, like sneaking in those things for people to hear ... while dancing around and having fun, it's just to me, it's a it's a clever move. And when I was in college, we listened to a song ... I was taking an African American Studies class. And we had to listen to a song and we didn't, it wasn't in English. And you could ... you so we're there vibing to the beat, dancing and all that stuff. And it was a really great song. And the professor said, Okay, what do you think the song was about? And obviously, it's uplifting, it's dancing, like you want to. So it must be something good, they're celebrating. But the message of the song was actually about domestic abuse, and how domestic abuse is wrong, and how we shouldn't be this ... shouldn't be part of our world. So be aware that domestic abuse is happening. Be aware that, you know, people may be suffering with this, this issue, but it's it's presented in such an uplifting and, and dancing way. It's just such a cool way to combine messaging with music.

Aaron Gobler:

So somebody who would understand the lyrics or, you know, he said that was in another language, right? Yeah, somebody who would under actually understand the lyrics would perhaps because of the uplifting sound of the song be actually absorbing the message to?

Jacob Hanson:

Definitely, yeah, while dancing and having fun and being at a party or whatever it is. Yeah. So I see that I see parts of that in this song. Rebelution is great. They're West Coast. They're considered a West Coast reggae band, and I have another name, but I think it's West Coast. And they're a group of kids that started out they were all going to school at Santa Barbara. And they were started playing Isla Vista, you know, the little party part of Santa Barbara. And they were just playing around there. And all sudden, people were like, Hey, this is actually kind of ... you guys are good. And they've just blown up from now they're traveling around the world. And this is their thing. You can start to hear differences in the style of reggae. So it's a little bit different than Ziggy's. And you'll see ... you'll hear a huge contrast with the roots reggae coming up next. But this one is a little, it's a little fresher. It's a little newer. And just the instruments that are involved are, it's more it's not relevant to today, but it's closer aligned with today's music, as opposed to like the older style of music.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, it seems to have a fresher sound, and more synonymous with the more popular music sound that we have today. And so I think it's more accessible to people listen to the music today as almost an entry into into reggae music. And then they might go back and then listen to the you know, the old original Roots reggae. And it is quite a contrast with the third song. So we'll use that as a segue into the third song which is "Peace, Love and Harmony" by Culture. And this is from 1988 and you identify this as one of the more original reggae sounds. So let's get that a listen. Jacob, I know that reggae has a history back to the 60s and earlier but when I hear this song, this is what I think of the classic reggae sound like the textbook reggae sound. Why did you choose to include this song?

Jacob Hanson:

Yes, this is getting back to the sub genre of roots reggae. Oh, that's what you're hearing. That's why it feels like this is what reggae is. That's what I think too. I feel like this is this is reggae. I'm juiced right now hearing this. One of the things that I like about Culture and I chose Culture and I chose this song was right away. You get the beat. You can hear the melody in the background the music going on, like if it was just the beat, I could just be jam into that Culture, in the style of music that they play, every song is similar to that every song makes you want to dance every song makes you want to bob your head, whatever your way of expressing through your body, what you're feeling. Culture gives that. One of the things with Roots reggae is that there's some things you can understand what they're saying. And there's some things that I don't understand what they're saying. And part of that is because they're actually speaking a different language. Jamaicans have their own language, which is a blend of English and other things. They call it Patois. And so some of the times they might be speaking Patois, which kind of sounds like English, you're like, oh, maybe I, maybe I know, maybe I don't know what they're saying. And it's probably because of that. So there's good parts of the song that I don't know what they're saying. And I tried to find on, I tried to look up their lyrics. And there's not even lyrics that match the song at all. So, you know, what I can really take from this song is, I mean, if I don't know how many times they repeated it, but peace, love and harmony. And I think that's what everyone wants, right. And I think that you can just hear through the emotions in their voices, that that's what they want. So this song just really gets me going and gets me excited for for that just having trying to reach that goal of having peace, love and harmony amongst yourself, amongst your friends amongst your city, your country, the world, all of it is it's almost every song that they have is just it's either uplifting. It's motivational, it reminds you of living a good life. And so yeah, I was sad that I couldn't fit everybody into my my three. But I think having this Roots reggae as the last one kind of introducing Roots reggae, and that's the heart of reggae for me. And exploring that just excites me.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, it's been a lot of fun listening to these songs, you know, experiencing these songs for the first time this week, and then having the discussion about them with you. Is there anything else you'd like to share about your selections, like something that may have occurred to you while we were playing them or something I didn't ask you about?

Jacob Hanson:

Exploring reggae, to me, it helps you. I feel now after listening, even though I've listened to these songs multiple times, I listened to them the last few days, but hearing every time I hear them, it just takes any negative feelings away. Anything that's brought you down, it can bring you up, the messages that you get can change the outcome of your entire day. And so I think that it has a wide range of uses, it helps relieve your stress, it makes you happy. It gives you advice over life issues. It's something you can dance or cry to. I think that, you know, hearing that and exploring reggae is just an amazing thing. So I like to share that with everyone. That's why I played it so much in the gym. And so I would tell you about the different artists as they were going on and everything I knew about them, because I think the messages are just really, they're great, and they're important.

Aaron Gobler:

I really appreciate you putting this list together. It's clear that you spent a lot of time trying to decide which were the three you were going to use and I think they each captured a different kind of experience of reggae music, and I really enjoyed speaking with you about them today. I want to thank you again for for for being on the show.

Unknown:

Yeah, thank you and I got to give my shout-out real quick because I love these guys and they'd be upset if they heard this that I didn't include them. I listened to them so much and I love them. So a couple guys, if if you find yourself on Spotify and want to dive a little bit deeper into the roots of reggae, Gregory Isaacs, he's the king of Lover's Rock, which is another sub genre. Bob Marley, we know king of reggae. Yellowman was the king of Dancehall, which is another subcategory. That Dancehall is ... you,, you're out there, dancing and having fun right? Steel Pulse and UB40 ... I'm sure everyone heard of UB40. Those are both great reggae bands also.

Aaron Gobler:

Thank you again Jacob for your time today ... and to my listeners if you want to be part of the show, start by going to our website, Aaron's Radio dot Show, and clicking on the My Three Songs button on the homepage. You can also sign up for our mailing list so you'll know immediately when a new episode is available. You can also find Aaron's Radio Show on your favorite podcast service, but the podcast episodes Only include interviews and no licensed music. So until next time, keep your ears and mind open and let more music into your world.

Female voice:

You're listening to Aaron's Radio Show

Aaron Gobler:

That was great.

Jacob Hanson:

Yeah, I enjoyed it; that's so fun. I'm like on a high right now. That was cool. Yeah.

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