Aaron’s Radio Show

Episode 52

My Three Songs with Susan Mashiyama

 

Notes

Episode Notes

EPISODE 52 – My Three Songs with Susan Mashiyama  Welcome, everyone, to Episode 52. This is the 42nd in our series of episodes called My Three Songs where my guest chooses three memorable songs and we listen to the songs and talk about why they are meaningful to my guest. Susan Mashiyama is a multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter. (She is also the leader of a ukulele class I’ve been attending for two years!) We talked about her passion for music and her current projects. In this episode, we listen to and discuss three meaningful songs from her life, including “The Mummer’s Dance” by Loreena McKennitt.

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Three Songs

  1. The Mummer’s Dance – Loreena McKennitt (1997)
  2. Star Wars Main Title – John Williams (1977)
  3. Baba Yetu – Christopher Tin (2005)

Aaron’s Radio Show has been licensed by ASCAP and BMI to include songs from their repertories in performances on this website.

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Transcript

This transcript was originally generated using artificial intelligence ("AI") software. It has been edited by a human being, but it may still contain some misspellings, lack necessary punctuation, or include other anomalies. We are regularly working to improve our transcripts!


Jake:

Coming to you almost live from Berkeley, California, it's Aaron's Radio Show with your host, Aaron Gobler.

Aaron Gobler:

Thanks, Jake. And welcome, everybody to Episode 52. Welcome to My Three Songs, where I play three special songs chosen by my guest, and we talk about why they chose each song. Today, my guest is Susan Mashiyama. I've gotten to know Susan through a ukulele class she teaches. And I've learned a lot from her in the past couple years, I have to say, although I must admit I don't practice as often as I should. Welcome to the show. Susan, how are you today?

Susan Mashiyama:

I'm doing pretty well. Thank you, Aaron. Thanks for having me on your show.

Aaron Gobler:

Susan, I'm so glad you decided to be on the show. And I'm really eager to talk to you about music in a deeper way than just what we discussed and play in our ukulele class. And through the class. I've learned that you play several instruments and are very talented vocally, too. Can you tell us about some of the projects that you've been So Susan, what is your Patreon site so that our listeners can working on?

Susan Mashiyama:

Sure. Yeah, thank you. Thank you for asking. I teach music and I play music. And I'm a singer-songwriter, and I arrange music. So my main instrument now is the Celtic Harp. So that the Celtic Harp is the original harp, and it's also called called the Folk Harp or Lever Harp. And so you've got these levers on the side and you flip them to create the accidentals, so to make a note, go up a half step or, or come back down. And so I've got some things that I've been doing with the Celtic Harp, I guess the main project that I have going on an on an ongoing basis as I have a Patreon site. So I make music videos, because like, I really got interested in the idea of how to create music were there were visuals that helped to express the feeling of the song, or the music that you're playing. What happened was, I started to make these videos and they were taking a lot of time and effort. And I was about to give up on them on this YouTube channel. And then a follower of mine, he suggested that I start a Patreon site. And he said, he thought that some people would be really interested in backing me, so I started it, and you just make I make a music video once a month, and then people pledge, you know, like from $1, and up a month. And in the beginning, it was like, Oh, it would pay for, you know, like a violin string. But it was exciting to help people who are really, it's such a different feeling when you know that there are people who are actually interested in your music and are following it. And they're giving some money like for your videos. It's it's a really nice feeling. And so it's really motivated me to finish some projects that I haven't you know, been picking up on like, kept him on the back check it out? burner, and it's motivated me to compose more. Anyways. Oh, thanks for asking Aaron. It's if you go to Patreon so patreon.com and then just do a search for a Susan's harp songs. So it's, it looks like Susan sharp songs. But it's Susan's harp songs, no punctuation,

Aaron Gobler:

Susan's harp songs (susansharpsongs) on Patreon. So check that out and become a patron of Susan's and, and help support her craft. Thank you so much. And I enjoy seeing your videos that you share with us on the ukulele class.

Susan Mashiyama:

Thank you. So that's that's one thing. And I guess the other things that I've been doing, I've been writing songs and I teach several instruments. I teach piano and beginner violin. I played fiddle. I got really interested in Irish fiddles, they learned how to play in that style, and harp, I can't remember what I said guitar or ukulele. And I also sing, so I play at in different events, and I played a couple of churches in addition to the teaching,

Aaron Gobler:

That's fantastic. I guess similar to learning languages ... as somebody learns a lot of languages they get to internalize patterns and just methods and the science of it. Do you find you can pick up a new instrument relatively easily or do you find that there's a serious learning curve? Just for any other ... any instrument you pick up?

Susan Mashiyama:

That's a good question. So for certain certain instruments, there's a lot of crossover, for example, the piano and the harp, the theory of it is really, really closely related. So they're, they're both kind of like linear, the strings go from C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, it's, it's all in a line, and there's a separate string for each note. And on the keyboard, there's a separate key for each note. So all the theory of that was really something I was super familiar with. But what was really different, was the technique is completely different. So on the piano, your hands are above the keyboard, and you've got gravity to help you make the sounds. So you can play you can pound away on the piano, with gravity helping you. And on the harp, your hands are suspended in the air. So you have to pull on the strings. And in the beginning, I was teaching myself, I started developing carpal tunnel ... yeah, my wrist started hurting quite a bit, because I had improper technique. So I had to go back and learn the proper technique. And for several weeks, I felt like I couldn't play at all. And so it was kind of distressing, because I'd gotten to the point where I felt like I had some facility, but then my wrists were hurting. So I had to try to relearn the technique. And yeah, it was just like, trying to walk again. But then once I got that, it, it really helps with the with the pain ...

Aaron Gobler.:

... and then playing other kinds of stringed instruments, like, you know, guitar, ukulele and such. I mean, I'm guessing they're similar ...

Susan Mashiyama:

Very similar. Yes, yes, yes, if you know, the guitar. So I learned that guitar first. And that's got a six strings and the ukulele only has four. And the chord shapes are pretty much the same except or you have two fewer strings to deal with on the ukulele. So it's really, really, really nice. And the names of the chords are different, but the shapes where you put your fingers and arrangement of your fingers on the fingerboard are the same, except you have to fewer strings to deal with. So you know, one chord might have only one finger, you have to put down so it's, it's really, really great for people who are learning music, but other instruments, like wind instruments. Yeah, that's completely different. So I tried to pick up a wind instrument, I love the flute, oh, my gosh, I just you know, I had been wanting to play the flute for years. And I thought, well, I'll pick up the penny whistle. It's a little whistle that they use in Irish music. And I guess originally, it actually cost a penny. So it's, it's not that expensive, even today, but it's a lot more than a penny. But anyway, you play this thing. And it's kind of like a recorder. But it's got a higher, more delicate sound, unless you play it really loud. And then it's really shrill. But it's really, yeah, it's really different. The fingering is totally different from a stringed instrument ... actually I went to a music camp, and I was playing this really well-known Irish song called The Butterfly on it over and over. And somebody asked me to stop! And I said, What the heck, this is a music camp.

Aaron Gobler:

That's funny.

Susan Mashiyama:

It just, it just shows that it's, it's really different ... some of the different instruments have such different technique. Yeah, so going from one to the other can be very challenging.

Aaron Gobler:

Music has a theory, and there's certainly a science to it, too. And so I'm just wondering if you having that basis, it does give you an upper hand on picking up some kind of new instrument, just because you already have internalized some of that music theory.

Susan Mashiyama:

Oh, definitely. Because of the my piano background, I started with piano. And that's a really fantastic foundation for understanding music because in the music, you've got two hands and the upper part of the music is expressed on the treble clef, the upper clef with your right hand plays that usually, and then the lower hand is the bass clef. In some instruments, you only see one clef or the other. So if you start with a piano, then you learn how to read music on both cliffs, you have a better understanding of like, a bigger range of notes. And you can play chords on the piano. So there's a lot more music theory that's covered on the piano, that might not be covered with some of the other instruments like the wind instruments don't really play chords. And like the stringed instruments, like the violin, you'll play limited chords, you know, with two or perhaps three strings if you're really good. So yes, yeah, so a lot of the theory is really transferable to understand how chords work, understand, you know, key signatures and the timing, how music is written down on sheet music, for sure.

Aaron Gobler.:

Yeah. And one of the things you said at the very start was about the piano having each you know, each actual physical key that you depress being a note and that it's very easy to like, especially with gravity, like you mentioned a moment ago to use the piano and that does seem like an excellent instrument for introducing music. For the reasons that you described. Certainly, if you tell someone to hit the G, or the middle C or something, it's right there in front of them. It's not like they've got to look at what string, they got to pluck and what finger they have to depress.

Susan Mashiyama:

Or like with the violin, they don't have any frets. So one of the most challenging things is to try to play in tune.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, thank you for that discussion. I have not played enough instruments really, or studied an instrument. I played clarinet in fourth grade, like a lot of people have. But not really to internalize much theory, but only to say that I know how I've listened to a lot of music. Like you heard in the ukulele class, I'll try to end a song in a kind of rock strumming pattern that no one ever taught me that, but it just seemed like that was a natural thing to do. Because I've heard it so many times.

Susan Mashiyama:

Yeah. And we we really appreciate your rock style. It really, it's, it's so it's great. Yeah. That's what music is one of the best things about music is you can express your personal your personal style, and it really livens up the class. So seriously, we all appreciate it.

Aaron Gobler:

It's so exciting. It just kind of not mind-blowing, per se, but it really is, kind of sets off, you know, some fireworks in my brain, at least when I'm actually producing music. Because I've listened to music so much over my life. And it's meant so much to me, that to actually generate something is really is this really cool. And it just really sets off little sparks in me.

Susan Mashiyama:

That's terrific. Yeah, that's, that's what that ukulele is so great at. My parents were born and raised in Hawaii. And you know, my family's lived in Hawaii for a long time. So we've always had a ukulele around. But my first instrument was the piano well, aside from the voice, so I remember singing for as long as I can remember. And so there was a big emphasis on classical music. My mother really wanted us to learn how to play the piano. And so we learn classical music, me and my brother and my sister. But I'm really starting to appreciate the ukulele. Because it's so easy for people who don't have a musical background, to learn how to play and within a few lessons, they'll be strumming and singing along and creating music. And it's something that it's like with the violin, you know, there's such a steep learning curve, you have to learn how to hold the bow, you have to learn how to hold the violin, you have to learn how to finger and then you have to learn how to make it sound somewhat, you know, not like a cat screaming but on a on the something like the ukulele it sounds pretty nice right away. And people can really express their own, you know, whatever it is that they want to stay with. It is very expressive. There's a lot of versatility with it. So yeah, it's it's really great to see people developing on this instrument and just being able to, you know, play. And I think that it lifts a lot of people's spirits ... to be able to play music.

Aaron Gobler:

For me with ukulele, I feel like it's somewhat of a full circle in a way that my, my Dad went to, I believe he may have been in Hawaii and he brought back ... I have a brother and a sister. He brought back three ukuleles for us when we were little kids. And me being a tinkerer, I actually removed half of the back of my ukulele and fastened a speaker to the hole ... and is there some official name for the hole in one of these instruments?

Susan Mashiyama:

Sound hole, I think sound hole.

Aaron Gobler:

Okay, yeah. So I covered the sound hole with a speaker from Radio Shack. And I hooked up a little phone like, you know, a headphone jack to the side of the ukulele. And then I plugged it into this makeshift amplifier and I had, and I glued the piece of wood back and I had basically an electric ukulele. I still didn't know how to play it, you know, but I wouldn't make lots of noise with it. So I feel like it's it's really great that I am actually able to, you know, play a real ukulele.

Susan Mashiyama:

Wow, you sounded like you're very inventive.

Aaron Gobler:

I mean, Radio Shack, I could talk, I could just do a whole podcast about Radio Shack. So not like anybody would want to listen to that except other people who work for Radio Shack!

Susan Mashiyama:

So the ukulele or it's can also be pronounced EW-kew-lay-lee, if you pronounce it, the way that you would in the Hawaiian language, was introduced from Portugal in the late late 1800s. And the Hawaiians just fell in love with it, and they adopted it as their own. So it's actually not technically a traditional Hawaiian instrument, but it is closely closely associated with it. And my parents taught us when we were young, you know, a number of popular songs that they knew when they were growing up, and I know Aaron knows this, we we pretty regularly try to play "Aloha Oe", which is a song written by Queen Lili'uokalani, who was the last monarch of Hawaii, before the country was illegally overthrown, unfortunately. And after Hawaii was overthrown, the Caucasian people who were in power, they wanted to erase the Hawaiian culture. So they actually banned Hawaiian languages language in the schools. And before that, Christian missionaries convinced the Queen at the time to ban public performances of the Hula. So I've heard stories where people were afraid to speak Hawaiian, and they were afraid to dance the Hula, because they thought they would get caught and punished. And so now it's a complete turn-around, there was a big renaissance. And now it's actually mandated in schools that they have to include education about Hawaiian language and culture, which I think is wonderful. We definitely try to sing some wind songs in the class. And it's been great. It's really interesting. In the ukulele class, I've been able to choose music that I've just wanted to choose and do research on the background. And so just learning more and more about different kinds of music.

Aaron Gobler.:

And to that, I wonder if we can find some Portuguese songs that were originally played or, or created?

Susan Mashiyama:

That's a good idea. Yeah. Oh, that sounds wonderful. But anyway, it's a it's a great instrument. And I think I really started to appreciate it. It's so compact and portable. So I was hauling my harp around. And then the next day, I had to run off to class and I was holding my ukulele, or ukulele with two fingers. Yeah. And I was like, Oh, this is great. This is such a portable instrument.

Aaron Gobler.:

It is a very portable instrument. Susan, I have, I have a couple questions I asked everybody. And we kind of already talked a little bit about this. How does music fit into your life? Do you seek it out? Is it usually in the foreground or background of each day? I mean, you probably kind of answered some of those already, but you have anything else you would say about how it fits into your life? Or is it your life? It sounds like it is your life?

Susan Mashiyama:

Um, it's a really big part of my life. Yeah, I also for the other things that I do for work, I also do, I'm a writer as well, so I do medical writing. But it's yeah, it's a huge part of my life. So I'll be it just seems like I need to hear music. So I'll have it on in the background often. But on the other hand, sometimes I feel like silence is musical in and of itself. I think giving your ears a rest is also something I think is good for you musically. It's sort of a funny thing. I remember when I was in some sort of music program, and one of the leaders was warning us not to overpractice. So you know, you can kind of get too entrenched in something. And so I guess the idea is like to give your, your mind and your ears a break. And that can actually help you musically. So I love to have music on a lot. I love all kinds of different music, and I love playing music and singing. But I also really appreciate breaks. Like I'll take breaks where I just don't have any music on at all.

Aaron Gobler:

So let's just jump right into your song list. The songs you chose were "The Mummer's Dance" by Loreena McKennitt from 1997, the "Star Wars Main Title" theme composed by John Williams and performed by the London Symphony Orchestra from 1977. And "Baba Yetu" by Christopher Tin, as performed by the Soweto Choir, with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra from 2005. Now, Susan, those are the longest introduction titles that I've had on the show.

Susan Mashiyama:

Oh, do I win a prize?

Aaron Gobler:

No, but but I just want to mention that. So I'm eager for us both to listen to these songs. And I'm interested in knowing why each of them is meaningful to you that start listening to the first song, "The "Mummer's Dance" by Loreena McKennitt.

Aaron Gobler.:

Susan, that's a beautiful song. It felt both simple and robust at the same time, and I listened to it with headphones, and the sounds of the way they're mixed together really make it a banquet for my ears. I'm eager to know what inspired you to include the song on your list.

Susan Mashiyama:

I included that song on my list because it was such a different sort of music for me to listen to. I mean, it sounded kinda like folk music, but it had this like groove or more pop beat to it. And it had these instruments that I'd never heard of before, and it was just kind of a revelation the way that it mixed, like storytelling and all these like different sounds and it was so lush and beautiful. You know, it included a lot of Celtic and I guess mostly Celtic themes and myths and I guess some English as well. Loreena McKennitt is of Scottish roots. And I believe she's Canadian. She was born and raised in Canada. But I remember, like listening to some of the music, and thinking that must be like, that must be a newfangled electronic instrument. And then when I looked it up, no, it's like a really old, Middle Eastern instrument. And it just has this really resonant, gorgeous sound that was really different to me. And some of the different patterns that she played. It was just so imaginative. It felt like it was from a time from long ago, but it was from a, it was like from a culture I'd never had heard of before. And it was it was basically a fusion of different sounds Western and Middle Eastern, and, you know, folk music. Yeah, just so imaginative, so beautiful. And plus, I've gotten a really high soprano voice and a lot of pop music ... the range is right where my voice breaks. So it's really uncomfortable for me to sing it. But Loreena McKennitt has a really nice kind of voice. And so I could sing it. And so I would just, I would just listen to it and sing over and over the songs. And they actually, I think there were two versions of this, there was the remix, where they added a much stronger pop and dance beat. And that was a huge hit. So I just remember, I used to go to these dances, where people would just do like kind of freestyle dancing. And when they would put the song on, everybody would just start flying across the floor. They got so inspired by this music. And it was it was great just felt like you're transported in a way. And I think that that helped get me really interested in more Celtic music, which I was super absorbed with for a really long time.

Aaron Gobler.:

Yeah, thank you for sharing that. That was a really it really was kind of a feast for the ears.

Susan Mashiyama:

Yeah, the percussion and different kinds of music that hurdy gurdy never heard of it before. And that just, just like I said, it was just such a new experience to be hearing all these different mixes. And it sounded so good together.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, thanks again, for including that. Let's jump to your next song, which is very different than this, the previous one, and it is the "Star Wars Main Title" theme. And it is composed by John Williams and the London Symphony Orchestra. So let's give that a listen. And we'll talk about it on the other side.

Aaron Gobler.:

Well, Susan, that's a real rush. I mean, this tune is almost universally recognizable. Whenever I hear it, my mind immediately fills with visuals from the original Star Wars trilogy. I can imagine scenes of the movie for when I hear certain parts of this composition ... what is what inspired you to include the song on your list?

Susan Mashiyama:

Oh, gosh, this music. Just amazing. I mean, it was so just seems so perfect for this film. And I think like a lot of people have a huge fondness for the original Star Wars film and you know the other films as well, but especially the original one, it was just so dazzling, you know such a groundbreaker visually. And then the story really caught my imagination. And my sister and brother and I were kind of obsessed with this movie. And we went over and over and over to the theater to watch it. And we all of us loved the music. And so we saved up our money. And it was a double LP. So it was quite expensive. We each had to have our own copy. And it was a good thing too. Because we want we listened to it over I listened to you for hours. And we probably would have worn out our copy if we didn't have our own or own sets ... you know, as as somebody who is brought up playing classical music, and I played in Symphony Orchestra and I played and I sing in the chorus. And so I was exposed to a lot of classical music, and to hear this kind of style with this epic film and to capture, like the motion and the imagination wildly just different instruments. Yeah, it was just so wonderful. You know, I just loved like listening to the different instruments and the way that John Williams he wove into the tapestry like the different themes for different characters or did friend's scenarios, different times and places. It was just so so beautiful. And it seemed to fit the space theme so well because it was another time another place. And so it felt really otherworldly. And at the same time, because it was classical music, it sounded very familiar. And it also felt really human. Like it just sounded like it spoke to a lot of common humanity that we have. And I think this is when I started to really love the sound of the cello. That part of [Susan mimics sound of cellos] I mean, oh, just gorgeous. And the London Symphony Orchestra. Wow, they did such an amazing job. I mean, it was such a long time ago, but it just I'm still I'm still have so much fondness for it. And it's still It sounds so beautiful to my ears and just like the variation, all the different sounds and the themes, and yeah, it's just great. Amazing musicianship on it.

Aaron Gobler:

So let's jump into the last song on your list. "Baba Yetu" is a song that was written by Christopher Tin and this recording was performed by the Soweto Gospel Choir. So let's give that a listen.

Aaron Gobler.:

Thanks so much for introducing me to the song I found that kind of inspiring and uplifting. It's really kind of exciting to hear it ... kind of reminded me a little bit of like "Prince of Egypt." And you know, I looked up the translation of the Swahili and it's about exalting the Heavenly Father and asking for His forgiveness, mercy and guidance. And it certainly seemed to share themes with with the Lord's Prayer very closely. Why did you choose to include this song?

Susan Mashiyama:

Oh, I love this song. So much. I was just kind of browsing on YouTube. And I came across this song. And it was performed by a choir, I believe in South Africa. And so I thought that it was a you know, either composed as a traditional song or incorporated traditional African / South African music, or perhaps is composed by a modern African composer. It turns out that as I did more research, and it took me a while to realize that it was actually a modern composition, written for a video game, which I thought was hilarious, because up until then, you know, I really didn't know too much about video game music. And apparently, they are really investing in the music. So they're hiring really good composers and really fine instrumentalists for the music. And so some of the music is great. This was actually composed by Christopher Tin, so he's an American composer. He's of Chinese descent. It was also really nice because I'm a person of Asian background. I don't know very many Asian American composers. I feel like I might know more composers who are Asian, you know, from Asia. But this is like an American composer of Asian background. And I just love it so much all the so many things I love about it. In particular, this is my favorite version. So it's the Soweto Gospel Choir featured on it. Oh my gosh, the vocalists are just amazing. This is not an easy song. You can hear the male soloist, it's got quite a huge range, he has to be really rich and deep on some of the lower parts and then discover, you know, the high part. And he's got to really open up and still be full and rich up there that high on those high notes. And the way that it passes back and forth between the men's section and the women's section. It just feels so balanced and full. And I love it. There's some like parts where that like a female will go ahead [Susan yells out] and just love that. So you hear this different texture of the women's voices in the men's voices. I mean, it's just epic, just so sweeping, but it has a lot of subtlety as well. And and the instrumentalists are amazing the percussionist, and the Royal Philharmonic, I think is the is the orchestra that's playing. And it's so it is the Lord's Prayer that was translated into Swahili, and, you know, not having much familiarity with languages from Africa. I just was struck by the beauty of it. I think that each language has its own sound. And each one is so beautiful in and of itself. And so I was looking at a performance of it on the internet. And I was looking at the comments that people had posted on this and just people from all around the world were writing comments on on how much the song meant to them and what a wonderful reaction that it engendered in people. And then it was really nice because I saw quite a few comments from people who are from Africa. And they were saying that they thought it was wonderful to hear foreigners. So that the version that I saw it was a group that were mostly white musicians who were performing it. But there were people from Africa who were saying they really loved the way that they had, you know, actually took the time to study the language so that they pronounced it so well, and just made them feel really joyous when they when they saw that, you know, to have that kind of care and attention put into that is really nice. Yeah, it just learning a different language, it opens up your world. And even though this isn't, it's not written by somebody who is of African descent, but the idea is that it's about honoring different civilizations and different cultures. And yeah, I just, I just love it. And it makes you feel like dancing, it's so joyous. And I think also, you know, the fact that the text of it is, you know, it's got Christian religion is, is the basis of it, some of the best things about religion is that it really can lift your spirits. And there is a lot of good and a lot of beneficial things that have come out of the best parts of religion, I feel, you know, they have been kind and taking care of people who may need help, and just feeling lifted up and feeling, you know, spiritual and rejoicing in this kind of higher spirit. So that I feel like that's what's expressed in this and I just love it.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, I totally, I totally with you on how religion can be so spiritually uplifting, and to engender and bind us together in acts of kindness. Like, you know, like you were saying, it's a very beautiful song. Thank you. Thank you for sharing that.

Susan Mashiyama:

Yeah. If I could just say, say one other thing about this song. Well so, my grandfather was a Buddhist minister, and he actually became the Bishop of the Shingon Buddhist church in Hawaii. So I was brought up in the Buddhist church, and a big part of Buddhism is compassion. So this idea of loving kindness towards yourself and towards others, and you try to encompass the entire world, in your loving thoughts. I just feel like a lot of the best parts of religions, different religions, there's a common core of ideals of trying to generate peace, and kindness, compassion, and love. And so I just feel like there's a lot to learn from from many, many different religions. And I feel like this song just expresses some of the best of those ideals. Thank you for playing this. I love this song so much.

Aaron Gobler:

Susan, is there anything else you'd like to share about your selections, like something you may have thought of while we were listening to the songs or answers to questions that I that I hadn't asked you?

Susan Mashiyama:

It was great to try to think about some songs that were a really big part of my life and just still spoke to me and mean a lot to me even today. So thank you for that.

Aaron Gobler:

Yeah, yeah. Thank you for taking the time to put the list together. And to be on the show. I had a lot of fun. It was really a joy listening to the songs prior to the show and thinking about them and how we would talk about them. I hope you had a good time, too.

Susan Mashiyama:

Yes, I did. Yes. Thank you for having me on the show, Aaron. Yes. Your love and enthusiasm for music really comes through in what you do.

Aaron Gobler:

Well thank you ... and to my listeners. If you want to be part of the show. Start by going to our website, Aaron's Radio dot show and clicking on the My Three Songs button on the homepage. You can also sign up for our mailing list, so you'll know immediately when a new episode is available. You can also find Aaron's Radio Show on your favorite podcast service. But the podcast episodes only include interviews and no licensed music. Before we wrap up this episode, I wanted to let you know of an experimental format we have for the radio show called Dedications. If you're familiar with Casey Kasem's Top 40 show, he would read a dedication written by one listener with hopes that it would reach the ears of another listener, and then he would play the song. I'm hoping to recapture some of that magic. So I'm asking you, if you have a dedication you'd like to make to somebody. Please go to Aaron's Radio dot show slash dedications to submit yours. Once I receive a few. I'll begin making episodes based on those dedications. So until next time, keep your ears and mind open and let more music into your world.

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